Tag Archives: Resources

The hype and trends of technology

With technology becoming more pervasive in our everyday lives and being prevalent in classrooms it is interesting to stop and take stock and reflect on technology trends from the past to inform us on what worked well and what didn’t. By reflecting on this I believe that I can fix my sight on the future and move forward with knowledge.

Let’s look at the facts that not that long ago it was standard modern practice to use acetate overhead project sheets and Gestetner copies.

It is always the risk, should you be an early adopter of a technology on the forefront trying to work out how to fit it into a class, or should you sit back and wait for it to become mainstream and are forced to use it because your organisation has created a user policy. The key question to ask, as an educator is; Why should we use technology in the classroom? (Drager, 1, 2015)

As a teacher it is always important to think about the affordances to technology that you are considering implementing in the class. Bower (2008) outlined an affordance classification system, that is incredible useful to work through when deciding on technology for the classroom, a process I went through for the Moodle Learning Management System (Drager, 2, 2015).

As a trainer when I go to use a new technology I will put it through an affordance review and also reflect on my own TPACK (Drager,3, 2015) with the technology to ensure that I am not just using a trendy new technology for the sake of it but there are solid links to curriculum.

Reflecting on technology trends from the past 10 years has been an interesting undertaking, especially in relation to what I personally used in education. It is interesting that though LMSs have been around for over 15 years that they still remain a critical part of the e-learning landscape, but the question is for how long (Conole, 2012)? I can map how I have taught by the technology that I used personally. Some key highlights from the years include:

  • 2006 learning to develop web content for my Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) which opened up an awareness of digital creation and curation.
  • 2007 the year of Virtual Worlds and social networks, with exciting projects such as ‘Virtual World’s – Real Learning’ from the then Australian Flexible Learning Framework inspiring people from the VET sector which opened up a huge new realm for me.
  • 2010, mobile media tablets changed workplace training due to the simplicity of use and ease of integration.

Gartner every year puts out a Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies. 2014 shows types of technology that have been around for a while but appear simply because they’ve gained mainstream attention, such as gamification.

Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2014 (Gartner, 2014)
Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2014 (Gartner, 2014)
Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2012 (Gartner, 2012)
Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2012 (Gartner, 2012)

The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies should be studied with a critical eye own in relation to education but linked to other important reports such as the Horizon Report to identify critical trends that will indeed support teaching and learning. When you compare 2012 to 2014 Hype Cycles you are able to see that BYOD was at its zenith in 2012, but does not even rate a mention in 2014. What does this mean to us in education and the trends in technology? Simply if there’s enough ‘hype’ around technology it can very quickly be adopted into mainstream and education.

 

References

Bower, M. (2008). Affordance analysis – matching learning tasks with learning technologies. Educational Media International, 45(1), 3-15. doi:10.1080/09523980701847115

Conole, G. (2015). Designing for Learning in an Open World (1st ed., pp. 47-63). Dordrecht: Springer. Retrieved from http://csuau.eblib.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1030803&echo=1&userid=Kw3jR%2bAhgEwAdjjiAfq0LQ%3d%3d&tstamp=1427684336&id=99B29BF9A978474F0ED16153A21450DBF7961F02

Drager, Y. 1, (2015). Affordances of Moodle – a multiplatform application. Yvette’s Reflective journal – A site of Discovery. Retrieved from https://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/yvette/2015/01/19/affordances-of-moodle-a-multiplatform-application/

Drager, Y. (2015). TPACK framework. Yvette’s Reflective Blog : A site of Discovery. Retrieved from https://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/yvette/2015/01/12/tpack-framework/

Drager, Y. (2015). Why should we use technology in the classroom?. Yvette’s Reflective Journal – A site of discovery. Retrieved from https://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/yvette/2015/01/12/why-we-should-use-technology-in-the-classroom/

Gartner,. (2014). Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies 2012. Retrieved from http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2124315

Gartner,. (2014). Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies 2014. Retrieved from http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2819918

The New Media Consortium,. (2014). NMC Horizon. Retrieved 30 March 2015, from http://www.nmc.org/nmc-horizon/

Web.archive.org,. (2007). Australian Flexible Learning Framework – Virtual Worlds – Real Learning!. Retrieved 30 March 2015, from http://web.archive.org/web/20070613001430/http://www.flexiblelearning.net.au/flx/go/home/projects/2006/newpractices2006/pid/368

Wikipedia,. (2015). Transparency (projection). Retrieved 30 March 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transparency_(projection)

Wikipedia,. (2014). Gestetner. Retrieved 30 March 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestetner

Social media in the VET classroom

VET inclass example of a twitter back-channel.
VET in class example of a twitter back-channel.

Social media for many means catching up with what friends are doing via Facebook or following the latest celebrity on Twitter. But is can be so much more than that for an educator who is prepared to put in some extra work to effectively use to Social Media within a class environment.

It is important to consider the affordances in relation to the learning program to determine if there will be of benefit to the students (Bower, 2008). There will always be resistance from some students when social media for a variety of reasons. Due to this resistance it is important to ensure that any learning done through this mechanism is duplicated elsewhere.

One crucial issue is of course age, with many social media requiring the user to be over a certain age to agree to the terms and conditions. For use in a VET classroom, as outlined by Roblyer (2013) it is crucial that appropriate social media site are chosen that will create a professional learning avenue for students. It is also important for students to understand this is a professional site and should not be linked to their personal activities. By utilizing the affordances outlined by Bower (2008) and the taxonomy of learning, teaching and assessing created by Anderson and Krathwohl (2001) a teacher can provide supported pedagogical reasoning behind why they are choosing a specific social media platform in their classroom.

One interesting piece of research by McCorkle D.E, and McCorkle Y.L., (2012) focussed on the use of LinkedIn in a marketing class room. The article outlined the assessment program that stepped students through the very basic setting up a profile to building a professional network.

This strategy has been reflected in current practice in the 2014 Article in Training Matters which focused on the use of LinkedIn in a VET Certificate III in Pathology qualification. The lecturer used LinkedIn in a variety of ways; the initial use was a discussion forum between students and industry but then it branched out as a mentoring forum for alumni students; a employment and job placement area; industry announcement. The heavy ties with industry through LinkedIn gave currency to the course.

With any social media it is important for students to understand why they are being asked to participate. Twitter as a back channel for on topic discussion by students during a lecture or presentation can vie valuable insight into the understanding by the students. This can simply be as easy as putting together a hashtag for the class group to respond to. In Hew & Cheung (2013) article they outlined how one institution saw an increase in GPA’s in the test group using twitter which was put down to students engaging with lecturers and content discussions via this social medium. Being able to access this application through a mobile device or desktop meant that the students were able to continue to learn and reflect of critical points 24/7.

The implementation of social media in a VET classroom does warrant investigation as an avenue to support students who are often in the workplace or studying through a blended delivery approach.

References

Anderson, L., & Krathwohl, D., (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. New York: Longman

Bower, M. (2008). Affordance analysis – matching learning tasks with learning technologies.Educational Media International, 45(1), 3-15. doi:10.1080/09523980701847115

Herrington, J., & Parker, J. (2013). Emerging technologies as cognitive tools for authentic learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(4). doi:10.1111/bjet.12048

Hew, K., & Cheung, W. (2013). Use of Web 2.0 technologies in K-12 and higher education: The search for evidence-based practice. Educational Research Review, 9, 47-64. doi:10.1016/j.edurev.2012.08.001

Jelfs, A., & Richardson, J. (2013). The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(2). doi:10.1111/j.1467-8535.2012.01308.x

Laurillard, D. (2009). The pedagogical challenges to collaborative technologies. International Journal of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 4(1). doi:10.1007/s11412-008-9056-2

McCorkle, D., & McCorkle, Y. (2012). Using Linkedin in the Marketing Classroom: Exploratory Insights and Recommendations for Teaching Social Media/Networking. Marketing Education Review, 22(2), 157-166. doi:10.2753/mer1052-8008220205

Passion for teaching. (2014). Training Matters, (20), 17. Retrieved from http://www.dtwd.wa.gov.au/employeesandstudents/training/otherinformation/trainingmatters/previousversions/Documents/April%202014/Training%20Matters%20April%202014%2017.pdf

Roblyer, M. (2013). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Harlow: Pearson.

Digital Preservation – Submission 2

In the best tradition of our Master of Education (Knowledge Networks and Digital Innovation) I would like to share my Assessment 2 submission.

In the creation of this assignment I discussed heavily with my PLE. Yvette's PLE

For this assignment we had to create a Microsoft PowerPoint to present to a group of people who had no knowledge of Digital Preservation. It could only be 12 content slides long and had to be presented in a 30 mins time slot with an accompanying script and annotated bibliography. The annotated bibliography was meant to act as a handout for session participants and needed to have a variety of rich media and text resources that a layperson would find helpful.

It helps to be creative when you have limitations like the number of slides, especially if you know how to use the software well, so I also included layered slides – which meant that I only used 12 slides (plus a cover slide) but in fact had 15 slides for a presentation point.

Please note that this assignment was completed in 2014 and in all likelihood the resource sites will need to be reviewed for currency.

Digital Preservation slideshow Yvette Drager

Digital Preservation Script Yvette Drager

Digital Preservation Annotated bibliography Yvette Drager

What has not been included is my reference list, which was extensive 🙂

Enjoy!

Yvette

 

 

 

 

 

Instructional Software for Construction Pathways (VET)

The Certificate II Construction Pathways program largely consists of 16-18 year old males with high levels of disengagement with paper-based learning that have a preference for practical, ‘hands on’ activities. I have focused on this learning area to seek out resources for the Instructional Software 5 areas as outlined by Roblyer (2013).

In the VET sector we have been fortunate that the National VET eLearning Strategy funded a large amount of resource development that align to various curriculum documents.

Drill and practice; Tutorial; and Problem Solving.

Flexible learning Numbers Toolbox
Flexible learning Numbers Toolbox

 

Numbers toolbox

http://toolboxes.flexiblelearning.net.au/series14/14_01.htm

This is a multilayered resource that actually comprises of all the Instructional Software areas. It deals with numeracy with a focus on Certificate II in Construction Pathways to ensure students have an appropriate skill level in numeracy as outlined by industry. Within the toolbox there are drill and practice activities that if you house in a Learning Management System such as Moodle can track the students’ progress as these are all SCORM learning objects that report through to the grade book.

Note this is an interactive learning simulation which I am classing as a serious game that will support the construction trades.

 

 

 

Simulation

The White Card Game - entry page
The White Card Game – entry page

 

The white card game

http://www.whitecardgame.com.au/

Aimed at CPCCOHS1001A – Work safely in the construction industry

This is an excellent ‘off-the-job’ simulation that works them through critical choices within a workplace context in terms of safety.

It can become a little click here to level up but it is worthwhile for a lower level VET qualification to support students who are new to the workforce.

 

 

 

 

Instructional game

Estimating and Costing interactive game.
Estimating and Costing interactive game.

 

Estimating and costing carpentry jobs

https://nationalvetcontent.edu.au/share/page/document-details?nodeRef=workspace://SpacesStore/dfe8d668-bf05-4542-84ce-029915092f7c

This game has the user work through measuring a deck to work out the cost of the timber needed to replace the decking boards for the customer. It particularly good for low literacy and numeracy level students working in the construction area.

 

 

The Certificate II Construction Pathways program lends itself to a blended delivery approach, in-particular when students have block release to a Registered Training Organisation. These e-learning resources a supportive and provide valuable underpinning knowledge that the students do require when they are on work placement. These resources could also be used in a ‘Flipped Classroom’ (Sams and Bergmann, 2013) style class format which lends itself to having the student work through formative activities at home prior to working with the teacher in the classroom to ensure that while on block release the students use their teacher class time to greatest advantage.

References

Nationalvetcontent.edu.au,. (2006). National VET Content:Estimating and costing carpentry jobs. Retrieved 20 January 2015, from https://nationalvetcontent.edu.au/share/page/document-details?nodeRef=workspace://SpacesStore/dfe8d668-bf05-4542-84ce-029915092f7c

Roblyer, M. (2013). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Harlow: Pearson.

Sams, A., & Bergmann, J. (2013). Flip Your Students’ Learning. Educational Leadership, 2013, Vol.70(6), P.16-20, Vol.70(6), p. 16-20.

The White Card Game,. (2013). The White Card Game. Retrieved 20 January 2015, from http://www.whitecardgame.com.au/

Toolboxes.flexiblelearning.net.au,. (2015). Flexible Learning Toolboxes – Numbers 14.01. Retrieved 20 January 2015, from http://toolboxes.flexiblelearning.net.au/series14/14_01.htm

Augment

For anyone who likes to be cutting edge there is always the Augmented Reality tool Augment to get your students using. Yes they will need some skills in creating graphics but there are plenty of free public libraries available that you can tap into for some brilliant free trials.

With Augment you can:

  • Use existing public libraries
  • Upload your own 3D models
  • Create your own markers
  • Link content on the internet to markers

There is a free version that I have used for a number of years, but you can pay for it and get higher end functions.

Plane create by scanning augment marker
Augment Spitfire Plane

 

This example is a custom marker created by a colleague that we both use in  demonstrations. You scan the marker with the Augment App which will load the 3D model of the plane. If you tap on the ‘web link’ option under the model displayed then it takes you through to a wiki page about the Spitfire plane.

We purposefully did this  so that the people we are training can see that you can use existing materials for AR, but to be honest the potential to create custom content is getting easier.

As you can see it is impressive to see the plane hovering in the middle of a classroom. The students (seeing through the device) can move around and continue to view the image at slightly different angles. But the user must keep the markers in sight otherwise the plane will disappear.

 

But the coolest thing is now you can have you students create engineering pieces in Minecraft and view them through Augment via some simple steps.

  1. Create object in Minecraft
  2. Open the Minecraft world file in Mineways on a PC and select a portion of the the Minecraft work (the piece they have worked on) and export as a 3D model.
  3. Import the 3D model into a 3D package like Blender (free) and save or export ready for upload into Augment  OR you can use a 3D printer to print (as long as the object is not huge).
  4. Zip up the model and texture files and upload into your free account at augmentedev.com
Example of 3D view of Minecraft section
Augment Minecraft example

 

You may say that this is for high end students but I had my 12 year old successfully follow the steps and created this image – this is a section of the top of the mountain. 

This is well worth investigating as so many students are getting valuable experience building in Minecraft, now you can get them to actually ‘see’ their designs in the real world.

Games are so very valuable for students to explore and Minecraft is definitely a way that we can engage and use new technologies to meet outcomes required. The added bonus, students will actually have fun while learning and exploring!

Interactivity analysis framework

Interaction on mobile devices
Interaction on mobile devices

In Beauchamp and Kennewell (2010) ‘Interactivity in the classroom and its impact on learning discussed the interactivity analysis framework which outlined interactivity areas that included; group interaction; authoritative interactivity; dialectic interactivity; dialogic interactivity and synergistic interactivity.

In my current context my students would be working in a Moodle Learning Management System (LMS) environment with a Blackboard Collaborate virtual classroom (VC) integration. When the interactivity framework is applied to this learning environment there is the possibility that within a teaching term all areas of interaction could be achieved due to the nature of the software involved and the constructionist and collaborative pedagogical style (Bower et al., 2010; Laurillard, 2008 and Roblyer, p 40-50, 2013) that I favour for my teaching.

Group interaction: As Beauchamp and Kennewell (2010) stated group interaction can be hard to track as often the teacher is not present. By using the collaborative tools within the LMS such as collaborative group wikis, discussion forums, group database, and automatic recording of group work in the Collaborate virtual classroom allows the teacher the ability to track and monitor the groups work and the level of interaction between individuals. Something that can be problematic in a physical classroom. In my current context the class was split into 4 groups which had members from around Australia. The groups had to work together weekly on tasks. They had a group wiki to add their thoughts to for a written record and had access to the VC as moderators where they could record their session and take screen grabs of their work from the system.

Authoritative interactivity:  This is the ‘Sage on the Stage’ style of teaching where it is teacher directed, or content directed. In the LMS the content such as interactive multimedia (Roblyer, 2013) can be created that interacts with the grade book to record the students work through the interaction ideas can be clarified through a virtual classroom or text chat to expand on ideas that the student has worked through. In my current context I present ‘keynote’ style online sessions via the VC to my students that are linked to content in the LMS. In these sessions I expand on ideas and clarify points for my students.

Dialectic interactivity: Once the student has worked through the content outlined in the authoritative interactivity the teacher could then have the students work in groups around the key ideas. In my current context during a VC class the students are invited to use the Collaborates ‘whiteboard’ facility and chat area’s to respond to probing questions. It is very useful to use the whiteboard as it enables better group work in the class.

Dialogic interactivity: In dialogic interactivity the student has more of a voice in the lesson, with the teacher becoming more of the ‘Meddler in the Middle’ supporting the students in-class engagement. In my current context my students have had to present on topics such as effectively facilitating online where they have presented content and posed questions to the class group to facilitate the discussion around their topic. They then reflected on this through their wiki spaces and in the discussion forums

Synergistic interactivity: In adult education synergistic interactivity is often seen as the ‘norm’ rather than the exception. This is especially true with some users of LMS who ‘set and forget’ the course letting the students get on with their learning. Synergistic interactivity independent reflective activities that students do in a whole class setting (Beauchamp and Kennewell, 2010). In my current context the teacher becomes the ‘Guide on the side’ with students running sessions in the VC and facilitating discussions with-in the LMS to further develop their knowledge and ideas of  the topics being taught.

In my assignment there is a blend of all five points. However, I have focussed more on the group interaction, dialectic interactivity; dialogic interactivity and synergistic interactivity rather than the Authoritative interactivity.

References

Beauchamp, G., & Kennewell, S. (2010). Interactivity in the classroom and its impact on learning. Computers & Education, 54(3), 759-766. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.09.033

Bower, M., Hedberg, J.G., Kuswara, A., (2010), A framework for Web 2.0 learning design, Educational Media International, 47 (3), 177-190, DOI: 10.1080/09523987.2010.518811

Laurillard, D. (2009). The pedagogical challenges to collaborative technologies. International Journal Of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 4(1), 5-20. doi:10.1007/s11412-008-9056-2

Roblyer, M. (2013). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Harlow: Pearson.

 

Western Australian – lesson planning and free resource sites

Example Moodle site design
Example Moodle site design

In Western Australia there are government divisions setup to support professional learning for both K-12 teachers and VET practitioners for both ‘traditional teaching’ and e-learning. Some very useful sites are listed below.

We have been very fortunate with funding and careful planning which has meant that have been many initiatives setup that support teachers and trainers in Western Australia.

K-12 resource sites for WA

Aboriginal education lesson plans and resources –

http://www.det.wa.edu.au/aboriginaleducation/apac/detcms/navigation/lesson-plans/?oid=MultiPartArticle-id-9197505

Curriculum council internet resources –

http://www.ceo.wa.edu.au/home/carey.peter/cfi4.html

VET resource sites for WA

Department of Training and Workforce Development various resources that relate to VET in Australia with a Western Australian focus on National initiatives –

http://www.vetinfonet.dtwd.wa.gov.au/Pages/Home.aspx

Sector Capability Moodle site is the Department of Training and Workforce Development free online resource centre that supports e-learning in the VET sector in Western Australia.

http://elss.dtwd.wa.gov.au/

WestOne Services free learning object repository (professionally developed resources for mainly the VET sector) –

http://tle.westone.wa.gov.au/content/access/home.do

Of course those these resources are available online does not mean I am endorsing their content, the mapping of resources, currency or the authenticity of the lesson plans or resources. It is always useful to take the prepared lessons and review them to your own context through methods outlined in documents such as Planning to teach an ICT lesson (Simmons & Hawkins, 2009).

References

Simmons, C.c & Hawkins, C. (2009). Planning to teach an ICT lesson. In Teaching ICT (pp.54-105). London; Sage Publications Ltd.

Thoughts on curriculum for Assessment 2

For the second assessment I am considering using a unit from the Training and Assessment Training Package – TAEDES503A – Design and develop e-learning resources from the qualification TAE50211 Diploma of Training Design and Development. The primary focus of this unit is the design and development of e-learning resources and reflects primarily the ADDIE instructional design framework. The prerequisite for this unit is that students must already hold the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, and are currently training in a VET environment.

Person thinkingI am looking at utilizing a flipped classroom model (Sams and Bergmann, 2013) and will utilize a project-based portfolio as the final summative assessment, due at the end of the course. Content for the students ‘home’ learning will be housed in the Moodle Learning Management System. The affordances  as outlined by Bower (2008) in my previous post ‘Affordances of Moodle – a multiplatform application‘ show that this software it is a viable option for the flipped learning model.

In the assessment I am planning on incorporating technology into three sessions with each session being three (3) hours in length. These sessions are taken from the series of 10 that I would normally take to teach the whole unit. Students are expected to work through a small interactive SCORM  (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) learning object in Moodle prior to each session.

The principles outlined in the learning objects are reviewed and then the students implement them ina variety of project-based avtivities resulting in the following outputs:

  1. Moodle HTML page
  2. Learning Design Plan – overarching
  3. Storyboard first draft.

Software proposed

Moodle – Learning Management System. Free download and install. To run online with students needs to be installed on a Linux Server.

Learning Design Tool (LDT) – VET specific software that assists the user in creating a learning design experience for a learning resource. This is a free tool with the output being a Microsoft Word document.

Draw.io – to create flow charts that are required for two sections in the LDT. Very simple to use and looks very similar to outputs from Visio. This gives you the ability to save locally or to a Google or Dropbox account.

Microsoft Word storyboard template- to create story boards for online or multimedia resources.

Technology proposed

Class set of laptops – with internet connections

Teacher computer – with internet connection

Data projector – linked to the teacher computer.

References

Bower, M. (2008). Affordance analysis – matching learning tasks with learning technologies. Educational Media International, 45(1), 3-15. doi: 10.1080/09523980701847115

Draw.io,. (2015). Flow Chart Maker & Online Diagram Software. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from https://www.draw.io/

Instructionaldesign.org,. (2015). ADDIE Model. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from http://www.instructionaldesign.org/models/addie.html

Ldt.eworks.edu.au,. (2010). Australian Flexible Learning Framework. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from http://ldt.eworks.edu.au/

Moodle.org,. (2015). Moodle – Open-source learning platform | Moodle.org. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from https://moodle.org/

Sams, A., & Bergmann, J. (2013). Flip Your Students’ Learning. Educational Leadership, 2013, Vol.70(6), P.16-20, Vol.70(6), p. 16-20.

SCORM,. (2008). SCORM Explained. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from http://scorm.com/scorm-explained/

 

Short look at Yvette and my education background

Yvette emailing from mobile
Yvette hard at work – emailing clients

Welcome and thanks for taking the time to look at my first blog post for ESC515 – Classroom Technologies

As you will be able to see this blog has formed part of my learning journey through the Master of Information and Communication Technologies (Education) and holds a wide variety of information on topics relating to education and elearning.

I started out as a high school teacher, with English, Drama and Music as my major study areas. I moved into the international film and theater industry where I worked on many famous faces and enjoyed the exciting years that this work area provided. I was offered the opportunity to lecture at Edith Cowan University in WA at WAAPA which was fantastic and renewed my interest and enthusiasm in teaching once more.

While working in the theater and film industry I maintained an interest in education and ran a small training organisation as part of my film company to up skill my employees and to teach as a special guest artist in high schools around Western Australia.

I was offered a position in a large WA TAFE in 1999 and worked as a casual lecturer/facilitator for them for over 10 years. This was around the time that the organisation was moving baby steps into the world of elearning. As I was working casual while running my own company I negotiated to become one of the first facilitators to offer online classes to my students. My first student groups were made up of mature aged ladies wanting to return to the workforce as teacher assistants, many of these people had very low computer skills and minimal experience in learning. Together we forged the new frontier together and had an amazing group learning experience.

From this first group a huge amount of students followed all having a unique and interesting experience ineffectively using an online classroom. From this wealth of experience I became a Learning Technology Mentor in the TAFE and helped other facilitators move into the elearning space using Learning Management Systems, podcasting, vodcasting etc way before it became mainstream. I was seen as cutting edge and ‘out there’ by my fellow facilitators.

I was offered a role presenting professional learning sessions for elearning and project managing the build of elearning resources for the WA VET sector for the Department of Education and Training, which has since become the Department of Training and Workforce Development. I was fortunate enough to become a project leader for the Australian Flexible Learning Framework and the National VET elearning Strategy (NVELS) which saw me working across Australia with the implementation of elearning in Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) in the VET sector.

With the demise of the National funding the NVELS the WA team (all three of us) still present training and consultations across WA, but also online sessions that anyone can access.

It is a fun and very challenging environment and with the ever changing landscape of technology it is amazing that I have a job that allows me the ‘play’ and the teach other how to use cutting edge technology such as Augmented Reality in their training spaces and to help people how technology can fit within a classroom using a blended or flipped approach no matter the circumstance.

This is an exciting time to be an educator and I am really looking forward to working with you all over the summer.