Tag Archives: elearning

Augment

For anyone who likes to be cutting edge there is always the Augmented Reality tool Augment to get your students using. Yes they will need some skills in creating graphics but there are plenty of free public libraries available that you can tap into for some brilliant free trials.

With Augment you can:

  • Use existing public libraries
  • Upload your own 3D models
  • Create your own markers
  • Link content on the internet to markers

There is a free version that I have used for a number of years, but you can pay for it and get higher end functions.

Plane create by scanning augment marker
Augment Spitfire Plane

 

This example is a custom marker created by a colleague that we both use in  demonstrations. You scan the marker with the Augment App which will load the 3D model of the plane. If you tap on the ‘web link’ option under the model displayed then it takes you through to a wiki page about the Spitfire plane.

We purposefully did this  so that the people we are training can see that you can use existing materials for AR, but to be honest the potential to create custom content is getting easier.

As you can see it is impressive to see the plane hovering in the middle of a classroom. The students (seeing through the device) can move around and continue to view the image at slightly different angles. But the user must keep the markers in sight otherwise the plane will disappear.

 

But the coolest thing is now you can have you students create engineering pieces in Minecraft and view them through Augment via some simple steps.

  1. Create object in Minecraft
  2. Open the Minecraft world file in Mineways on a PC and select a portion of the the Minecraft work (the piece they have worked on) and export as a 3D model.
  3. Import the 3D model into a 3D package like Blender (free) and save or export ready for upload into Augment  OR you can use a 3D printer to print (as long as the object is not huge).
  4. Zip up the model and texture files and upload into your free account at augmentedev.com
Example of 3D view of Minecraft section
Augment Minecraft example

 

You may say that this is for high end students but I had my 12 year old successfully follow the steps and created this image – this is a section of the top of the mountain. 

This is well worth investigating as so many students are getting valuable experience building in Minecraft, now you can get them to actually ‘see’ their designs in the real world.

Games are so very valuable for students to explore and Minecraft is definitely a way that we can engage and use new technologies to meet outcomes required. The added bonus, students will actually have fun while learning and exploring!

Blog task #1

key words taken from INF530 about digital learning and information technology
The content of INF530 and my readings inspired me to create a Worlde of my thoughts.

It was not a surprise to find out that I am an entrepreneurial learner, a tinkerer and a maker. I like to explore new concepts and resources with and work out new ways of using these in my work. Seely Brown, stated “We tend to underplay how important this is”, which is so very true, especially in the creative job role I have compared to others in the Government agency where I work. I want to help VET facilitators/trainers to become entrepreneurial learners as well so they can pass the traits onto their students.

The internet has become mainstream, no longer the domain for the higher education professional or researches, which allows people to connect and communicate, to share and impact on like minded individuals. Education, business and Government agencies all have to create policies around the use of digital technologies because of its prevalence in our everyday lives and as a learning mentor it is imperative that I can showcase digital technologies both at a senior management level and at trainer level for effective industry implementation.

However, I see the more critical issue being digital preservation of content. For the VET sector Registered Training Organisations (RTO) need to maintain records for up to 20 years, which is extremely problematic given both hardware and software obsolescence. This area is one that I am keen to explore further as currently it is not on the National agenda as a critical item but one that I can see will impact the VET sector in the coming years. Government funded VET colleges (TAFEs) in all likelihood do have some digital preservation strategy, my focus is the smaller private RTOs who do not have access the robust infrastructure for data recovery.

What I do find exciting is the changing dynamic of the traditional VET trainer away from being the ‘sage on the stage to a more guide on the side or meddler in the middle’ (Lukin et al., 2009). With this move away from ‘traditional’ classroom teaching means that new pedagogical styles can be explored such as ‘flipped learning’. This philosophy fits in well with the authentic learning tasks that have real world relevance (Reeves, Herrington & Oliver, 2002) that incorporate active learning experiences (Day & Kumar, 2010) which is important to VET delivery, but most importantly it helps students become lifelong learners. Marc Prensky summed this up nicely in this tweet:

Marc Prensky wrote: Today's educators' job is to show students how to teach themselves in today's and tomorrow's world, & to guide them in doing so.
Marc Prensky @marcprensky tweeted about the role of educators in a modern teaching world.

 

 

 

 

 

This space is exciting and challenging and personally I revel in the chance to change the stoic long term trainers who have been training a specific way for the past 20+ years to seeing a more flexible approach that fits both them and the students. If you think about it we need to train students in new ways for them to become successful workers in the future.

Change is something that moves slowly in the VET sector, just like any education area. The Web 3.0 is an exciting time and especially the ‘collaborative commons’ and Internet of Things. I am most excited to discover how these will impact on teaching and schools into the future.

 

References

Davies, R., Dean, D., & Ball, N. (2013). Flipping the classroom and instructional technology integration in a college-level information systems spreadsheet course. Educational Technology Research & Development, 61(4), 563-580. doi:10.1007/s11423-013-9305-6

Day, J., & Kumar, M. (2010). Using SMS Text Messaging to Create Individualized and Interactive Experiences in Large Classes: A Beer Game Example. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 8(1), 129-136. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4609.2009.00247.x

Lage, M., Platt, G., & Treglia, M. (2000). Inverting the Classroom: A Gateway to Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment. The Journal of Economic Education, 31(1), 30-43. doi:10.1080/00220480009596759

Lukin, R., Clark, W., Logan, K., Graber, R., Oliver, M., & Mee, A. (2009). Do Web 2.0 tools really open the door to learning: practices, perceptions and profiles of 11-16 year old learners?. Learning, Media and Technology, 34(2). Retrieved from http://ezproxy.csu.edu.au/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17439880902921949

Puentedura, R. (2014). SAMR and Bloom’s Taxonomy: Assembling the Puzzle. Common Sense Graphite. Retrieved from https://www.graphite.org/blog/samr-and-blooms-taxonomy-assembling-the-puzzle

Reeves, T. C., Herrington, J., & Oliver, R. (2002). Authentic activities and online learning. In A.Goody, J. Herrington, & M. Northcote (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2002 Annual International Conference of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA), Perth, Australia. Retrieved from: http://www.herdsa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/conference/2002/papers/Reeves.pdf

The Global One Room Schoolhouse: John Seely Brown (Highlights from JSB’s Keynote at DML2012). (2012, September 18). Retrieved March 5, 2015, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiGabUBQEnM&feature=youtu.be

Interactivity analysis framework

Interaction on mobile devices
Interaction on mobile devices

In Beauchamp and Kennewell (2010) ‘Interactivity in the classroom and its impact on learning discussed the interactivity analysis framework which outlined interactivity areas that included; group interaction; authoritative interactivity; dialectic interactivity; dialogic interactivity and synergistic interactivity.

In my current context my students would be working in a Moodle Learning Management System (LMS) environment with a Blackboard Collaborate virtual classroom (VC) integration. When the interactivity framework is applied to this learning environment there is the possibility that within a teaching term all areas of interaction could be achieved due to the nature of the software involved and the constructionist and collaborative pedagogical style (Bower et al., 2010; Laurillard, 2008 and Roblyer, p 40-50, 2013) that I favour for my teaching.

Group interaction: As Beauchamp and Kennewell (2010) stated group interaction can be hard to track as often the teacher is not present. By using the collaborative tools within the LMS such as collaborative group wikis, discussion forums, group database, and automatic recording of group work in the Collaborate virtual classroom allows the teacher the ability to track and monitor the groups work and the level of interaction between individuals. Something that can be problematic in a physical classroom. In my current context the class was split into 4 groups which had members from around Australia. The groups had to work together weekly on tasks. They had a group wiki to add their thoughts to for a written record and had access to the VC as moderators where they could record their session and take screen grabs of their work from the system.

Authoritative interactivity:  This is the ‘Sage on the Stage’ style of teaching where it is teacher directed, or content directed. In the LMS the content such as interactive multimedia (Roblyer, 2013) can be created that interacts with the grade book to record the students work through the interaction ideas can be clarified through a virtual classroom or text chat to expand on ideas that the student has worked through. In my current context I present ‘keynote’ style online sessions via the VC to my students that are linked to content in the LMS. In these sessions I expand on ideas and clarify points for my students.

Dialectic interactivity: Once the student has worked through the content outlined in the authoritative interactivity the teacher could then have the students work in groups around the key ideas. In my current context during a VC class the students are invited to use the Collaborates ‘whiteboard’ facility and chat area’s to respond to probing questions. It is very useful to use the whiteboard as it enables better group work in the class.

Dialogic interactivity: In dialogic interactivity the student has more of a voice in the lesson, with the teacher becoming more of the ‘Meddler in the Middle’ supporting the students in-class engagement. In my current context my students have had to present on topics such as effectively facilitating online where they have presented content and posed questions to the class group to facilitate the discussion around their topic. They then reflected on this through their wiki spaces and in the discussion forums

Synergistic interactivity: In adult education synergistic interactivity is often seen as the ‘norm’ rather than the exception. This is especially true with some users of LMS who ‘set and forget’ the course letting the students get on with their learning. Synergistic interactivity independent reflective activities that students do in a whole class setting (Beauchamp and Kennewell, 2010). In my current context the teacher becomes the ‘Guide on the side’ with students running sessions in the VC and facilitating discussions with-in the LMS to further develop their knowledge and ideas of  the topics being taught.

In my assignment there is a blend of all five points. However, I have focussed more on the group interaction, dialectic interactivity; dialogic interactivity and synergistic interactivity rather than the Authoritative interactivity.

References

Beauchamp, G., & Kennewell, S. (2010). Interactivity in the classroom and its impact on learning. Computers & Education, 54(3), 759-766. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/10.1016/j.compedu.2009.09.033

Bower, M., Hedberg, J.G., Kuswara, A., (2010), A framework for Web 2.0 learning design, Educational Media International, 47 (3), 177-190, DOI: 10.1080/09523987.2010.518811

Laurillard, D. (2009). The pedagogical challenges to collaborative technologies. International Journal Of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, 4(1), 5-20. doi:10.1007/s11412-008-9056-2

Roblyer, M. (2013). Integrating Educational Technology into Teaching. Harlow: Pearson.

 

Western Australian – lesson planning and free resource sites

Example Moodle site design
Example Moodle site design

In Western Australia there are government divisions setup to support professional learning for both K-12 teachers and VET practitioners for both ‘traditional teaching’ and e-learning. Some very useful sites are listed below.

We have been very fortunate with funding and careful planning which has meant that have been many initiatives setup that support teachers and trainers in Western Australia.

K-12 resource sites for WA

Aboriginal education lesson plans and resources –

http://www.det.wa.edu.au/aboriginaleducation/apac/detcms/navigation/lesson-plans/?oid=MultiPartArticle-id-9197505

Curriculum council internet resources –

http://www.ceo.wa.edu.au/home/carey.peter/cfi4.html

VET resource sites for WA

Department of Training and Workforce Development various resources that relate to VET in Australia with a Western Australian focus on National initiatives –

http://www.vetinfonet.dtwd.wa.gov.au/Pages/Home.aspx

Sector Capability Moodle site is the Department of Training and Workforce Development free online resource centre that supports e-learning in the VET sector in Western Australia.

http://elss.dtwd.wa.gov.au/

WestOne Services free learning object repository (professionally developed resources for mainly the VET sector) –

http://tle.westone.wa.gov.au/content/access/home.do

Of course those these resources are available online does not mean I am endorsing their content, the mapping of resources, currency or the authenticity of the lesson plans or resources. It is always useful to take the prepared lessons and review them to your own context through methods outlined in documents such as Planning to teach an ICT lesson (Simmons & Hawkins, 2009).

References

Simmons, C.c & Hawkins, C. (2009). Planning to teach an ICT lesson. In Teaching ICT (pp.54-105). London; Sage Publications Ltd.

Thoughts on curriculum for Assessment 2

For the second assessment I am considering using a unit from the Training and Assessment Training Package – TAEDES503A – Design and develop e-learning resources from the qualification TAE50211 Diploma of Training Design and Development. The primary focus of this unit is the design and development of e-learning resources and reflects primarily the ADDIE instructional design framework. The prerequisite for this unit is that students must already hold the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, and are currently training in a VET environment.

Person thinkingI am looking at utilizing a flipped classroom model (Sams and Bergmann, 2013) and will utilize a project-based portfolio as the final summative assessment, due at the end of the course. Content for the students ‘home’ learning will be housed in the Moodle Learning Management System. The affordances  as outlined by Bower (2008) in my previous post ‘Affordances of Moodle – a multiplatform application‘ show that this software it is a viable option for the flipped learning model.

In the assessment I am planning on incorporating technology into three sessions with each session being three (3) hours in length. These sessions are taken from the series of 10 that I would normally take to teach the whole unit. Students are expected to work through a small interactive SCORM  (Sharable Content Object Reference Model) learning object in Moodle prior to each session.

The principles outlined in the learning objects are reviewed and then the students implement them ina variety of project-based avtivities resulting in the following outputs:

  1. Moodle HTML page
  2. Learning Design Plan – overarching
  3. Storyboard first draft.

Software proposed

Moodle – Learning Management System. Free download and install. To run online with students needs to be installed on a Linux Server.

Learning Design Tool (LDT) – VET specific software that assists the user in creating a learning design experience for a learning resource. This is a free tool with the output being a Microsoft Word document.

Draw.io – to create flow charts that are required for two sections in the LDT. Very simple to use and looks very similar to outputs from Visio. This gives you the ability to save locally or to a Google or Dropbox account.

Microsoft Word storyboard template- to create story boards for online or multimedia resources.

Technology proposed

Class set of laptops – with internet connections

Teacher computer – with internet connection

Data projector – linked to the teacher computer.

References

Bower, M. (2008). Affordance analysis – matching learning tasks with learning technologies. Educational Media International, 45(1), 3-15. doi: 10.1080/09523980701847115

Draw.io,. (2015). Flow Chart Maker & Online Diagram Software. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from https://www.draw.io/

Instructionaldesign.org,. (2015). ADDIE Model. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from http://www.instructionaldesign.org/models/addie.html

Ldt.eworks.edu.au,. (2010). Australian Flexible Learning Framework. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from http://ldt.eworks.edu.au/

Moodle.org,. (2015). Moodle – Open-source learning platform | Moodle.org. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from https://moodle.org/

Sams, A., & Bergmann, J. (2013). Flip Your Students’ Learning. Educational Leadership, 2013, Vol.70(6), P.16-20, Vol.70(6), p. 16-20.

SCORM,. (2008). SCORM Explained. Retrieved 19 January 2015, from http://scorm.com/scorm-explained/

 

Educational Technologies research and the impact on teaching and learning

Education Technology IT research can been seen and is a moving feast or an ever changing environment.  IT technologies are forever evolving and Cox (2012) highlights the challenge of education research  because of this shifting sands environment. The author outlines thirteen (13) elements to considered to achieve  a greater reliability in research outcomes and most specifically that research “focuses on specific identifiable IT uses instead of trying to measure all of IT and its impact” (Cox, 2012, p. 17).

What is interesting is that in the VET sector the move to obtaining and accepting digital badges  as evidence for Recognition of Prior Learning for ‘skill sets’. This is bridging that gap between the formal and informal world of learning using technology as part of the evidence trail. As technologies evolve the lines between formal and informal learning will blur further, which logically will impact on formal research into educational technologies. MOOCs and informal learning programs that give ‘just in time’ learning are fast becoming the norm. for workers wanting to up-skill quickly in a piece of software for example which often rely on a teacher taking on a ‘guide on the side’ role rather than the traditional ‘sage on the stage’.

Moving forward the evolution of informal online learning to augment more formal training will increase. The VET sector must become more agile to ensure that it engages in deep learning whether it is formal or informal..

References

Cox, M. (2012). Formal to informal learning with IT: research challenges and issues for e-learning. Journal Of Computer Assisted Learning, 29(1), 85-105. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2729.2012.00483.x

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., Freeman, A. (2014). NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium

Digital native or immigrant?

I vividly remember seeing a presentation by Marc Prensky about his research into Digital Natives and immigrants. It was then an eye opener but research that I have always felt went to compartmentalize society into pre and post the digital technology revolution.

Driving simulator with digital immigrants
Testing the text and driving skills of a client in classroom.

By my age I am a digital immigrant, however, I have to say I do understand and use technology better than many digital natives that I know. I train VET practitioners in the use of digital technology in the training environment with a variety of skill levels.

The majority of people are not always very good at  assessing their level of expertise when using technology  (McFarlane, 2014). I rarely look at a persons age to be a solid indicator of their digital skill set, but have learnt that age does not mean that the person either does or does not have the skills.

I am currently the Chairperson of an Independent Public School in Perth, WA and often find it amusing to sit in meetings with the teaching staff and hear them complain about technology and the lack of professional development to teach them how to use it. I then reflect on students, who rarely get professional development to use any technology but muddle through.

It is the negative attitude in the VET sector that sometimes comes from left field, with the comment (often from trade areas) saying that technology is going to take their jobs. I often will point out it is there to augment their work and if they are a good facilitator then they have nothing to worry about. I also make it perfectly clear that technology will do nothing to improve ineffective teaching and will not turn a sows ear into a silk purse, but in the hands of someone who wants to augment their training then it can become a tool to assist in life long learning.

 

Jasinski, M. (2006). Innovate and integrate: Embedding innovative practices. 1st ed. [pdf] Canberra: DEST, Commonwealth of Australia. Available at: http://flexiblelearning.net.au/wp-content/uploads/Innovate_and_Integrate_Report1.pdf [Accessed 6 Oct. 2014].

Johnson, L., Adams Becker, S., Estrada, V., Freeman, A. (2014). NMC Horizon Report: 2014 Higher Education Edition. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium.

McFarlane, A. (2014). Authentic learning for the digital generation (p. 27). New York: Routledge

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants part 1. On the horizon, 9(5), 1-6.

Greg Whitby reflection post

When taken out of context Greg Whitby’s comment that the focus on technology is a ‘waste of time’ and if you focus on the technology you ignore the central problem and the central issue, could easily be seen to be inflammatory. However, Greg merely is saying that as educators it is very easy to jump on the most popular o newest technology band wagon without thought for the teaching. Primarily I believe that teaching and the students are the primary focus and any technology should augment what you do as a teacher, not the other way around.

Rowan & Bigmum (2012) outlined in Chapter 2 Schools and Computers : Tales of a Digital Romance one critical pattern that schools and institutions alike go through with the adoption of new technologies. With the constant need of upgrades schools and institutions find themselves in a never ending cycle of upgrades to ensure that the students or client base have access to the latest and ergo the best. Often the push can be detrimental and in fact sometimes gets in the way of the students learning.

As Cammy Bean outlined in her article Avoiding the Trap of Clicky-Clicky Bling-Bling there is a seduction factor of using the most sparkly and new technology only to discover that there is not much learning to be found behind the glittery exterior, which is what Greg Whitby was driving at with the above statement. We MUST think of the learning outcomes and not the technology. After all good facilitators have never let textbooks drive lesson planning so why with the advent of digital technologies are we allowing technology to dictate our lessons.

As educators we do need to be aware of technology and how it can be implemented into our classrooms and training, but not to the detriment of the learning. As educators we do need to critically reflect on technologies that we are wanting to use in the classroom and decide if they are they critical to the students achieving standards set out in the curriculum we are teaching or are just glittery ‘extras’ that just add fluff to the teaching.

 

 

Bean, C. (2011). elearn Magazine: Avoiding the Trap of Clicky-Clicky Bling-Bling. eLearn Magazine, an ACM Publication. Retrieved 30 December 2014, from http://elearnmag.acm.org/archive.cfm?aid=1999745

Rowan, L., & Bigum, C. (Eds.). (2012). Transformative Approaches to New Technologies and Student Diversity in Futures Oriented Classrooms : Future Proofing Education. Dordrecht, NLD: Springer. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com

Short look at Yvette and my education background

Yvette emailing from mobile
Yvette hard at work – emailing clients

Welcome and thanks for taking the time to look at my first blog post for ESC515 – Classroom Technologies

As you will be able to see this blog has formed part of my learning journey through the Master of Information and Communication Technologies (Education) and holds a wide variety of information on topics relating to education and elearning.

I started out as a high school teacher, with English, Drama and Music as my major study areas. I moved into the international film and theater industry where I worked on many famous faces and enjoyed the exciting years that this work area provided. I was offered the opportunity to lecture at Edith Cowan University in WA at WAAPA which was fantastic and renewed my interest and enthusiasm in teaching once more.

While working in the theater and film industry I maintained an interest in education and ran a small training organisation as part of my film company to up skill my employees and to teach as a special guest artist in high schools around Western Australia.

I was offered a position in a large WA TAFE in 1999 and worked as a casual lecturer/facilitator for them for over 10 years. This was around the time that the organisation was moving baby steps into the world of elearning. As I was working casual while running my own company I negotiated to become one of the first facilitators to offer online classes to my students. My first student groups were made up of mature aged ladies wanting to return to the workforce as teacher assistants, many of these people had very low computer skills and minimal experience in learning. Together we forged the new frontier together and had an amazing group learning experience.

From this first group a huge amount of students followed all having a unique and interesting experience ineffectively using an online classroom. From this wealth of experience I became a Learning Technology Mentor in the TAFE and helped other facilitators move into the elearning space using Learning Management Systems, podcasting, vodcasting etc way before it became mainstream. I was seen as cutting edge and ‘out there’ by my fellow facilitators.

I was offered a role presenting professional learning sessions for elearning and project managing the build of elearning resources for the WA VET sector for the Department of Education and Training, which has since become the Department of Training and Workforce Development. I was fortunate enough to become a project leader for the Australian Flexible Learning Framework and the National VET elearning Strategy (NVELS) which saw me working across Australia with the implementation of elearning in Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) in the VET sector.

With the demise of the National funding the NVELS the WA team (all three of us) still present training and consultations across WA, but also online sessions that anyone can access.

It is a fun and very challenging environment and with the ever changing landscape of technology it is amazing that I have a job that allows me the ‘play’ and the teach other how to use cutting edge technology such as Augmented Reality in their training spaces and to help people how technology can fit within a classroom using a blended or flipped approach no matter the circumstance.

This is an exciting time to be an educator and I am really looking forward to working with you all over the summer.

Critical Reflection for INF536

As this subject comes to an end it is time to reflect on my learning journey throughout this unit. I came to this subject with some previous experience developing high end digital resources and teaching online for a number of years. In some ways the hardest part during the early stages of the subject was to check this past ‘baggage’.

The most frustrating, but worthwhile experiences were the non-assessed assessments. These were the tangible areas of the course where I played and gained experience from real life situations such as the creative mornings. We were given the opportunity to observe and immerse ourselves in locations that would inform our case-studies. By learning to look at spaces critically with an outsider’s perspective opened my eyes up to different possibilities that the site I work on could offer. As a direct result of the immersion task I have managed to revitalize and re-purpose underused spaces on our site which are going to be crucial for an event later this year.

Design thinking (Brown, 2008) has many similarities to my work, creating resources and professional e-learning experiences for the VET sector where we now use rapid development tools to create ‘just-in-time’ information packages rather than large multimedia projects. I now come to design meetings with different perspectives on why something may not work and with options for improvement.

I have setup and actively use a ‘brain trust’, comprised of design specialists and VET trainers who will put great solution on the table quickly (Catmull, 2014). This group in turn does make me think smarter and has improved my ‘out-of-the-box’ thinking skills when brainstorming, making me more productive and creative with my work.

Prototyping is now a key in my work (Kuratko, et al. 2012). Prototyping has had a positive impact on the team I work with, and we are often heard saying “let’s try that option and see what we learn”. This has been particularly useful in trialing new mobile technologies when we are using them not for the original intended use, for example using a mobile phone as an external party microphone for a virtual conference situation.

This subject has validated the reasons behind how I design digital spaces for adult learners. This includes spaces that allow ‘real life’ experiences and allow the users to take ownership of the learning space. I have learnt the strength of parody to form design solutions (Schrage, 2013). My department was having problems with the look and feel of the home page on our Learning Management System (LMS) and did a mockup that looked similar to a Microsoft™ Windows© tablet. From this we found a theme that was customizable and the new site was born.

Finally I have learnt that digital learning spaces, are never be fully completed (Milne, 2006), but if you view it as an organic evolving space – a work in progress, with many voices of a community designing it. Technology will do nothing to improve ineffective teaching (Jasinski, 2006), but in the hands of an e-learning specialist it can become a place where life-long learning happens in dynamic and rich communities.

References

Brown, T., & Katz, B. (2011). Change by Design. Journal Of Product Innovation Management, 28(3), 381-383. doi:10.1111/j.1540-5885.2011.00806.x http://ezproxy.csu.edu.au/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bth&AN=59161877&site=ehost-live

Catmull, E. (2014, April). Inside the Pixar braintrust, Fast Company. Retrieved from: http://www.fastcompany.com/3027135/lessons-learned/inside-the-pixar-braintrust

Jasinski, M. (2006). Innovate and integrate: Embedding innovative practices. 1st ed. [pdf] Canberra: DEST, Commonwealth of Australia. Available at: http://flexiblelearning.net.au/wp-content/uploads/Innovate_and_Integrate_Report1.pdf [Accessed 6 Oct. 2014].

Kuratko, D., Goldsworthy, M., & Hornsby, G. (2012). The design-thinking process in innovation acceleration : transforming organizational thinking. (pp.103-123). Boston : Pearson.https://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/ereserve/pdf/kuratko-d1.pdf

Milne, A.J.(2006). Designing Blended Learning Space to the Student Experience. Retrieved November 19, 2011, from http://www.educause.edu/research-and-publications/books/learning-spaces/chapter-11-designing-blended-learning-space-student-experience

Schrage, M. (13 Feb, 2013). How Parody Inspires Great Design, Harvard Business Review Blog: Retrieved from: http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/02/how-paroday-inspires-great-des/

Wang, Y., & Chen, D. (2011). Instructors as Architects-Designing Learning Spaces for Discussion-Based Online Courses. Journal Of Educational Technology Systems, [online] 39(3), pp.281-294. doi:10.2190/ET.39.3.e http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.csu.edu.au/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=cbfaade9-0449-42cc-b0d0-3570bdb1626b%40sessionmgr110&vid=1&hid=101 [Accessed 8 October 2014