A new age dawns

It is easy to think from my perspective that technology has always been there, for a large portion of the population it has. My job would not exist if it were not for technology as I am a technology mentor and professional presenter of everything elearning. I remember when I first started working (all those years ago) and suggested that I would like to do some training on computers for my professional development. My boss at the time was sceptical as he really didn’t see the trend catching on but let me do it anyway, fortunately for me that professional development has become a lifelong career.

Technology is now everywhere almost insidious with how it has wriggled into every aspect of our daily lives, but the real trick for educationalists is to know how to harness technology to augment teaching and learning for the betterment of students.

In certain situations the use of technology can be harnessed for teaching the theory behind a topic. However, in the VET sector (and any other sector for that matter) there are just times when for safety reasons the learner needs to have a teacher, trainer mentor or workplace supervisor standing with them to see that they are safe.

Students need to be mentored physically for dangerous jobs. Morguefile image by Sergey81 http://mrg.bz/07ac96
Students need to be mentored physically for dangerous jobs.
Morguefile image by Sergey81 http://mrg.bz/07ac96

For instance the very first time a student uses a metal lathe should not be after they are watched a video created by their tutor then move out unsupervised into a workplace to work on the equipment. It is a recipe for disaster, that being said in a well-constructed course then a student will has the skills and abilities (thanks to working with a teacher/trainer/mentor etc) to achieve a physical component of assessment.

The most is important thought for teacher and learner alike in this new age is that everyone must become lifelong learners. Admittedly this can be confronting for some, but being open to learn from anyone is a very important skills set to obtain. In reflection of what has been happening in the VET sector in WA over the past few years, to be honest, this is not always the case. Some lecturers have their “happy place” and do not like to be challenged or even asked to move outside of their comfort zone to improve their teaching for the betterment of students. Yes there is a requirement that VET trainers all must have a certain amount of professional development a year, but nothing stops them from walking into a room signing on the role then sitting there doing nothing. They get the credit for attending but no actual learning.

This is not to say that there are some very good practitioners who are doing amazing blended and technology enhanced lessons. I myself when I was a VET lecturer had to foresight to let my students help “take control” of their learning.

Morguefile image by Arundo http://mrg.bz/848126
Morguefile image by Arundo http://mrg.bz/848126

I was training education assistants in a face-to-face environment who were due to go out on their block placement, the students had heard that I also trained online and begged me to setup an online site that they could stay in contact with each other for support throughout their placement. I was dubious but set it up and sat back to watch what would happen. Many students posted in what was happening and the positives of their placement, others posted up questions for help finally other posted up problems they needed help with. Not one topic was not course related and the students became a very close knitted group who managed together (with the help of myself) to get through their placements and secure jobs. The highlight was that this group did over 1000 discussion forum postings, all on topic and all supportive in nature when required within a 3 month period. These student were all seen as “technology challenged” by other trainers, but took to this system like ducks to water because they had the support of not only myself but of my students as well.

It is said that everything old is new again perhaps it is true of this new paradigm. After all we are adjusting our mindset to view things in a different way, much like when any major new system or way of thinking is introduced. We are in the settling period, but eventually education will catch-up to everyday life.

The future is bright. Morguefile image by Sergey81 http://mrg.bz/b1de09
The future is bright.
Morguefile image by Sergey81 http://mrg.bz/b1de09

The superhighway is at our doorstep and as long as we have the imagination and the willingness to grasp hold and be willing to learn the really the future is a bright one, maybe so bright you have to wear shades.

One thought on “A new age dawns”

  1. Hi Yvette,
    My apologies for belated comments. This post in particular resonated with me on a couple of different levels. Having finished the interpretive essay, one of the comments from my readings that jumped out at me was how MOOCS do not have a huge completion rate. One of the issues is there is no personal voice. No feedback nor communication with the instructor. http://www.tonybates.ca/tag/moocs/
    As you mentioned, your students succeeded because of your voice and theirs; the connection and communication.
    The other point, which piggybacks onto the last, was your comment that students, especially in your educational sphere, needs to have a teacher, trainer mentor or workplace supervisor standing with them to see that they are safe.” It reminded me of an article that Nadine Bailey posted about Singaporean education: The points about the elder and listening, are particularly still relevant, I feel. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/global_learning/2016/08/five_lessons_from_teaching_in_singapore.html

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