Curation—helping the learning designer to support academic capability

 

social-network-concept_zjmuhqho

What is the role of the digital information curator? Traditionally, a curator was the manager or overseer of a museum, gallery or library (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curator). Visser in an interview with Paper.li (Wilson, 2011) identifies the four main roles of the digital curator today:

  • Searching, filtering and selecting content (taste-maker)
  • Curatorial leadership to enable to understand what is valuable for the ‘brand’
  • Spot trends and feed these to strategists to help define future direction
  • Distributing to channels and helping to  fine-tune them.

As a learning designer, a significant part of my role is to support academic capability—I support the educators. Central to this role are the four main roles of the curator. My networking practice which include subscribing to online journals, following blogs, curating content for my Paper.li blog and attending workshops and conferences by leading educators (I recently attended workshops by George Siemens at QUT Brisbane and the HERDSA conference in Perth) also includes bringing these learnings together and distributing/sharing with my peers and academics.

Curatorial practices could be likened to the veins and arteries in our body—they ensure fresh ideas, information and emerging trends and technologies circulate to educators and peers who in turn use this information to inform their practice. Learning designers and educators need to ensure that curation is part of their learning practice to feed life back into teaching and learning.

 

Wilson, L. (2011, November 25). Gerrit Visser: Use smart knowledge networks to be a curator [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://blog.paper.li/2011/11/25/gerrit-visser-how-to-be-a-successful-curator-using-smart-knowledge-networks/

3 comments on “Curation—helping the learning designer to support academic capability
  1. I often get asked by teachers after I share a resource with them “where did you find that?” My answer is commonly Twitter, a blog that I follow or from someone in my PLN. Like you, a big part of my role as a teacher librarian is to support educators and to do this effectively I need to be a digital curator for many subject areas. At this stage email is still the main channel for passing on this information due to the culture of the school. I would like to investigate other means and would be interested in your suggestions Hyacinth.

    • Hi Karen

      Why don’t you start a padlet wall and invite the teachers to visit it. You could post videos and links for them on your wall.
      Perhaps you could also start a blog. Wix.com have some fantastic free templates. You could then invite the teachers to read your posts and comment (you could be the librarians version of Julie and Julia 🙂 ).Blog your curation travels.
      Depending on your school you could also start a private Facebook group. I was in one last semester (Networking for Information Professionals) and LOVED it.

      Hyacinth

    • Why don’t you start a padlet wall and invite the teachers to visit it. You could post videos and links for them on your wall.
      Perhaps you could also start a blog. Wix.com have some fantastic free templates. You could then invite the teachers to read your posts and comment (you could be the librarians version of Julie and Julia 🙂 ).Blog your curation travels.
      Depending on your school you could also start a private Facebook group. I was in one last semester (Networking for Information Professionals) and LOVED it.
      Hyacinth

Comments are closed.

Skip to toolbar