Digital Artefact Critique

In order to grow and develop we need to be able to reflect. As part of the #INF532 course we were asked to reflect, critique and provide some feedback on another student’s artefact from our first assessment task. The digital artefact task was about any aspect to do with Knowledge Networking and then to provide an exegesis with regards to the design and effectiveness of the digital artefact. I found the process challenging, but very worthwhile.

 

I have had a brief look at many of the fantastic artefacts created for this subject, and my fellow students have all done some amazing work. Thanks to Karen Malbon who has done a tremendous job of curating every artefact into one place – Check them out here http://www.pearltrees.com/karenmalbon/inf532-cohort-artefacts/id16278628

 

I have selected to write about a close friend’s artefact, Jordan Grant, and I was particularly interested to see how his turned out aiming it at students. URL: https://sites.google.com/site/gogetconnected/

The site has the following clear logo and banner at the top:

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The start of this website contains a cleverly crafted YouTube Clip that uses a lot of research evidence to support the message presented. Jordan uses quality images and sounds that meet creative commons licensing requirements, and the message conveyed is clearly articulated. It sets up the digital artefact premise of ‘the what and the why of connected learning’ is all about.

https://youtu.be/8fiiGJLRyWI

 

There are some further discussion points and an example of a student becoming a connected learner. A key point that he has on the site is:

“Remember. People don’t normally develop effective networks overnight. This will be a timely process that requires continual work. “

This is one of the key aspects of being a connected learner. It definitely does not happen overnight and is also not a one-way process. Instead, it needs time, effort, sharing and conversing with others.

 

The site then gives the students three different ways to begin their learning journey as connected learners – Blogging, Curating and Connecting. These are great ways for students to start organising their information, connecting, but also a way of reflecting on their learning. The site provides resources and examples of how to use these in practice and hyperlinked clips and articles used to support these sections. There is a clear link to the resources, and the information is set out to make it practical for students to engage with.

 

The final section provides a blogging prompt that enables the students to get started and reflect on their initial introduction to being a connected learner:

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Overall Jordan has demonstrated effective use of a range of different digital tools for  creative Knowledge construction. The breadth of tools used in creating the site, the clips and then linking to various others shows an understanding of the tools required for connected learning and knowledge construction. Some further examples of student blogs, or students using social media for learning could have been added; but that would defeat the premise of it being their own personalised and unique connected learning that takes place. There is also an understanding of instructional design and the application of knowledge network theory with this artefact. The participants are asked to consider the why and the what, before moving onto the how and then actually doing it themselves.
It is clearly a useful resource to get students started on the connected pathway and I would definitely consider using it with my own class in the near future.