Case Study Closed

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Time to reflect now that my final draft of my case study report is complete. My word count is currently a small problem but I have reached out to my network namely my job-share partner to read through and act as my editor.

My case study was one of those projects that organically grew and developed. Through extended professional reading  and experiences collecting data my ideas on how to organise the analysis and the key issues arose. In past academic case studies ( in fact I have only really done one other in my first masters degree) I found that the process of time allows different ideas, statistics and evidence to cross over and correlate. I eventually had the idea this time to overlay the digital literacies with the survey questions, interview transcript contents and evidence of students’ work, using colour coding. Discussions in the digital colloquium with Cathie from MacICT also helped to confirm that colour coding was a good strategy. What eventuated was a view of the data which highlighted the importance of digital literacy skills  in the autonomous learning that occurs when learners publish digital artefacts online independently.

What has eventuated is not a lot different form my proposal, it’s just more detailed. If I was to do another case study, one thing I would try is to approach it with a design thinking approach. There were some things I didn’t think of  till I was too far into the process.Time to observe and then ideate would of been good. A backward design approach where I would start at where I want to finish may of helped too.

Overall I’m quite happy with the evidence, creativity and thinking behind my case study. Time now to share it with my school teaching community, after all it was about them and for them.

INF532 Evaluative Report

a) An evaluative statement using the networked learning experiences documented on your Thinkspace blog as evidence of meeting the learning objectives of this subject

Educators need to understand the social nature of knowledge networks and the production of information to lead the members of their school communities on a process from being “knowledgeable to knowledge-able” (Wesch, 2010). Throughout this subject Knowledge Networking for Educators INF532 using my blog as a place of reflection, thought and creation I have come to understand more about the nature of information, social networks, information management, learning with digital tools and the value of a personal learning network.

In my first blog post for INF532 I wrote about being a student studying these new models of information (McQueen,2015 March 17) I wanted to attain more knowledge and skills about encouraging my learning community to create content, facilitating great learning (for all), preservation (& curation) of information and expand my Personal learning Network (PLN) and Personal Learning Environment (PLE). I have not been disappointed by the experiences that followed in this subject.

New models of information based on the technology tools of blogs, social media and global communication have had an exponential growth effect on content creation and seen the transformation of existing information formats. Blog posts now can be seen as credible sources of information for e.g. The Huffington Post (De Saulles, 2012). Blogs are going to form a major part of my future PLE in the future; using  the tool Feedly to follow blogs more effectively and strategically is a great starting point (McQueen, 2015 May 29).

Educators and our students are operating in a world where there is a new culture of learning. It’s a culture of learning where we can easily access unlimited resources and amazing technological tools, where learning can be ‘real’ in nearly every area of education and our lives (Thomas & Brown, 2011). This subject encourages educators to examine this culture and try to work out ways to cultivate it, helping others best learn and develop skills to continue learn in many contexts; digital, social and those that don’t even exist yet. I share many progressive thinking educators’ view that schools’ progression into this new culture of learning is being hindered and not supported by many aspects in our educational system (McQueen, 2015 March 21).

However as leaders in educational pedagogy we must take advantage of opportunities to show others how learning environments can be designed differently.  We need to take advantage of the diverse, collective nature of the new learning culture where others can learn from each other (Thomas & Brown, 2011) In Assessment item 2 for this subject I planned and designed a knowledge artefact to instruct my school teaching community about how a teaching team can benefit from developing an online community of practice (McQueen, 2015 March 22). The knowledge networking concepts that I addressed in the artefact were ‘communities of practice’ (Wenger, 2006), ‘participatory cultures’ (Rheingold, Participation Power, 2012), ‘networked learning’ (Richardson & Mancabelli, 2011)and ‘social media literacies’ (Rheingold, 2010). The process of creating this artefact was time consuming, but the persistence in learning to use new tools was worthwhile in the end. I took time during this process to research instructional design techniques that were relevant to adult learners’ needs (Moloney, 2010). The exegesis about this knowledge artefact summarised the purpose and impact of my artefact in supporting knowledge networking in my school’s community of teachers (McQueen, 2015 May 31).The opportunity to observe and critique another colleague’s knowledge artefact provided feedback and access to these artefacts for further use and also practice in the art of evaluating instructional design elements (McQueen, 2015 May 27).

INF532 has facilitated many opportunities to develop a suite of new media tools for information management, content creation, content curation, collaborative work.  I have tried out new tools like Listly (McQueen, 2015 May 29), Feedly (McQueen, 2015 March 21), Pixabay (McQueen 2015 May 31), and persevered with some of my existing tools like groups Diigo and Pinterest to use them more widely. My ever expanding use of Twitter though has been the most influential in developing my PLN.   The power of participation (Rheingold, Participation Power, 2012)was recently made evident when some recent new ideas on the planning of a new Library spaces were amplified via Twitter. Linking information with hashtags and connecting with influential others makes the sharing of good ideas easy. Facilitating these connections leads to the feeling of being a ‘connected educator’ or even leader (McQueen, 2015 May 29).

Pariser’s (2013) talk about “online filter bubbles” highlighted the importance of not only the way networks are influential and monitored in the internet but also the place of educators and especially teacher-librarians to be content curators. Using social curation tools like Pearltrees, Listly, and Pinterest are ways for connected educators to curate and share at the same time (McQueen, 2015 May 22).

Taking time to consider a better future direction in education, so we can support connected learners led to a closer investigation of flipped teaching (McQueen, 2015 May 29) .Amplifying learning using digital tools like Skype, Twitter and Google Hangouts is a simple but effective way of engaging learners and broadcasting their knowledge and created content (McQueen, 2015 May 29). Augmented reality is another new form of engaging connected learners which warrants further investigation (McQueen, 2015 May 28).

INF532 and the reflective blog I continued to contribute to, has provided the networked experiences which have collectively and creatively have made me a much more connected educator.

b) A reflective statement on your development as a connected educator as a result of studying INF532, and the implications for your role as a ‘connected leader’ within your school community, and/or at district/state/national level

To be a connected educator one must first understand what it means to be a learner within our (digital) connected work and also examine them as educator (Nussbaum-Beach & Hall, 2012).  As a result of studying INF532 I have developed an understanding of how knowledge networks form, can be facilitated and encouraged to flourish and also examine myself as a (connected) educator.

In the beginning of INF532 I reflected on my status as a connected educator (McQueen, 2015 April 6). Whilst engaging in Nussbaum-Beach & Hall’s (2012)reflection activity I identified a need for me collaborate with a wider group of people more often especially those teachers and students  at my own school, engage students in real-life and global situations and make learning environments richer in technology.  I have always been a learner leader in my academic groups, school and district community but I obviously needed to connect more; outside (not just in an academic manner) and within my school community. I can say that I have become more collaborative through content creation, sharing and connective with others over the last semester. Throughout INF532 I have learnt the rules of good and effective content curation (McQueen, 2015 May 23), the power in participation to build a PLN (McQueen, 2015 May 29) and how my pedagogy that I bring to my practice has progressively shifted.  I recently checked in with my social media literacy skills (Rheingold, Attention and 21st-century social media literacies, 2010) and found that yes they are interconnected and more refined (McQueen,2015 May 31).

A big learning curve and confidence boost as a connected educator happened when I uploaded my very own knowledge networking artefact to YouTube: How can a teaching team benefit from developing an online community of practice , shared it in Twitter and then bravely with my own school’s teaching community. The process of writing the exegesis and assessing others helped reinforce the important of using such artefacts to lead communities in building knowledge networks (McQueen, 2015, May 31 & 27).

The mindset that “we must take up the challenge on designing the future of education” (rather than dream or dread it) can lead to exciting prospects for the future of leaning (2Revolutions, 2012). The future design of schools and education requires a shift from hierarchical to networked learning to be able to be lifelong learners. Connected educators and leaders who understand these concepts are needed in schools to ensure that learning that happens in their schools is future proof (Schravemade, 2015). Establishing and setting purposes for these knowledge networks is an important part of this process too(McQueen, 2015 May 23).

In taking up this challenge, I will need to continue to try new tools and strategies, expand my PLN, create new content, share and curate content, and support connected learners. At the end of INF532 I shared some ideas for my future endeavours; they range from more complex curating, to public blogging and amplifying learning globally (McQueen, 2015 May 30).

The implications for my role as a connected leader will happen in my classrooms physical and digital), school, district and even globally. Teacher-Librarians play an important role because “they are intrinsically linked to effective and responsive information curation and dissemination in distributed environments within and beyond the school” (O’Connell, 2011) I feel a responsibly to lead the design for change in my local and global communities. I am lucky I have a supportive Principal who believes teacher librarians can be game changers. I have always felt that Libraries and their leaders and staff have opportunities to be the antidote to those aspects that our education systems have not got quite right. The study I have done so far in this degree and INF532 has provided me with a seat at the table to join in and lead conversations about new designs for learning in our schools.

I listened with interest to Greg Green, the Principal who ‘flipped’ his whole school. It didn’t happen overnight. He connected with a small group of like-minded educators who could see a more effective way of teachers and students working together to facilitate better learning.  They were a  group of innovative educators, they tried out new tools, shared their ideas and success; others caught on (November, 2011). Now Green and his team have redesigned the learning and their students have developed life-long learning skills. This is knowledge networking and designing better education practices at its best.

As a connected educator who now has skills in creating knowledge networks I can design better education practices too and in the process support and lead connected learners on any scale: local to global. I can lead them in the use and organisation of information, sharing of ideas, learning and the creation of knowledge.

Bibliography

2Revolutions. (2012, March). The Future of Learning. Retrieved May 2015, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoSJ3_dZcm8

De Saulles, M. (2012). New models of information production. In M. De Saulles, Information 2.0: new models of information production, distribution and consumption (pp. 13-35). London: Facet.

McQueen. (2015, May 22). ‘Beware of Online Filter Bubbles’: an important video to view. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/22/beware-of-online-filter-bubbles-an-important-video-to-view/

McQueen. (2015, May 29). A tool for gathering, organising and making the most of blog posts:Feedly. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/a-new-tool-for-gathering-organising-and-making-the-most-of-blog-posts-feedly/

McQueen, M. (2015). Retrieved 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 28). A case study: using augmented reality to amplify learning in the school library program. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/28/a-case-study-of-using-augmented-reality-to-amplify-learning-in-the-school-library-program/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 31). A check up on my 21st-Century social media literacy and participatory skills. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/31/a-check-up-on-my-21st-century-social-media-literacy-and-participatory-skills/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 29). A flipped school!! Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/a-flipped-school/

McQueen, M. (2015, March 22). A knowledge building project. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/03/22/a-knowledge-building-project/

McQueen, M. (2015, March 21). A new culture of learning. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/03/21/a-new-culture-of-learning/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 27). An amplified learning idea to try out – connecting over books & reading. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/27/an-amplified-learning-idea-to-try-out-connecting-over-books-reading/

McQueen, M. (2015, March 15). Being a student -new models of information. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/03/17/being-a-student-new-models-of-information/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 27). Critique of Greg Miller’s artefact ‘using twitter to grow your PLN’. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog.

McQueen, M. (2015, May 30). It’s important to try new things…. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/30/its-important-to-try-new-things/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 31). Knowledge networking artefact & exegesis. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/31/knowledge-networking-artefact/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 23). Knowledge networks: establishing and setting purposes. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/23/knowledge-networks-establishing-and-setting-purposes/

McQueen, M. (2015, April 6). Reflections on “defining the connected educator”. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/04/06/reflections-on-defining-the-connected-educator/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 23). The ideal content curation practice. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/23/the-ideal-content-curation-practice/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 29). The power in participation. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/the-power-in-participation/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 29). Trying out a different digital curation tool – Listly. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s refective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/trying-out-a-different-digital-curation-tool-listly/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 22). What pedagogical and content knowledge do you bring to your practice? Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s Reflective Blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/22/what-pedagogical-and-content-knowledge-do-you-bring-to-your-practice/

Moloney, K. (2010). There is no excuse for bad instructional design. Training and development in Australia, 22-23.

November, A. (2011). Learn from a school that has completely flipped out – An interview with Greg Green on flipped learning model. [podcast]. Retrieved May 2015, from November Learning Podcast Series: http://novemberlearning.com/an-interview-with-greg-green-on-flipped-learning-model/

Nussbaum-Beach, S., & Hall, L. (2012). Defining the connected educator. In S. Nussbaum-Beach, & L. Hall, The connected educator: Learning and leading in a digital age (pp. 3-24). Bloomington: Solution Tree Press.

O’Connell, J. (2011, October). Teacher librarians are important. Retrieved June 2015, from Hey jude living in an online world: http://judyoconnell.com/2011/10/27/teacher-librarians-are-important/

Pariser, E. (2013, March). Beware online “filter bubbles” – Eli Pariser. Retrieved May 2015, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4w48Ip-KPRs&feature=youtu.be

Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention and 21st-century social media literacies. Educase review, 14-24.

Rheingold, H. (2012). Participation Power. In H. Rheingold, Net smart: how to thrive online (pp. 111-139). USA: MIT Press.

Richardson, W., & Mancabelli, R. (2011). The power of networked learning. In W. Richardson, & R. Mancabelli, Personal learning networks: using the power of conections to transform education (pp. 1-14). Moorabbin: Solution Tree Press.

Schravemade, K. (2015, May). From hierarchical to networked:ensuring lifeready and lifeworthy learning in the digital age. Retrieved May 2015, from katschravdigitalessayinf530: http://katschravdigitalessayinf530.weebly.com/

Thomas, D., & Brown, J. (2011). Arc-of-life learning. In D. Thomas, & J. Brown, A new culture of learning: cultivating imagination for a world of constant change (pp. 17-33). Lexington,KY: CreateSpace.

Wenger, E. (2006). Communities of practice a brief introduction. Retrieved April 2015, from http://wenger-trayner.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/06-Brief-introduction-to-communities-of-practice.pdf

Wesch, M. (2010, October). From knowledgeable to knowledge-able. Retrieved May 2015, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeaAHv4UTI8&feature=youtu.be

What pedagogical and content knowledge do you bring to your practice?

The pedagogical and content knowledge I bring to my practice has evolved through my experiences as a Primary school teacher, study and practice as a teacher-librarian( in Primary and now a Secondary school) and currently through more extensive study in knowledge networks and digital innovation. I have strongly valued the way continued education has built up my pedagogical and content knowledge.

The main pedagogical and content knowledge I would draw on regularly is related to:

*social construction of knowledge

*the inquiry process

*Vygostky’s Zone of Proximal Development

*Knowledge building cycle

*evidence based practice

*reading strategies

*Hattie’s effect sizes

*Connectivism as a Digital Age Learning Theory

*Design Thinking

*Knowledge Networks construction and maintenance

*21st century literacies

Some of the References that have resonated with me are

Brown, T. (n.d.). Retrieved from Design Thinking – Thoughts by Tim Brown: http://designthinking.ideo.com

Brown, T. (2009). Change by design: How design thinking transforms organisations. Harper Business.

D.School. (2012). Method:How Might We Qustions method. Retrieved 2014, from http://dschool.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/HMW-METHODCARD.pdf

Davies, A., Fidler, D., & Gorbis, M. (2011). Future Work Skills 2020. Phoenix: University of Phoenix Research Institute.

Hattie, J., & Yates, G. C. (2014). Visible Learning and the Science of How We Learn. Routledge.

Kuratko, D., Goldsworthy, M., & Hornsby, G. (2012). The design-thinking process in Innovation accerlation: transforming organisational thinking. Boston: Pearson.

O’Connell, J. (2014, June). Preparing for the Impact of Web 3.0. Retrieved June 2014, from SlideShare: http://www.slideshare.net/heyjudeonline/preparing-for-the-impact-of-web-30

Organisation, V. L. (2013). Feedback in schools by John Hattie. Retrieved October 2014, from Visible Learning Organisation: http://visible-learning.org/2013/10/john-hattie-article-about-feedback-in-schools/

Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention and 21st-century social media literacies. Educase review, 14-24.

Siemens, G. (2004, December 12). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. Retrieved March 31st, 2014, from elearnspace: http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm

Wenger, E. (2006). Communities of practice a brief introduction. Retrieved April 2015, from http://wenger-trayner.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/06-Brief-introduction-to-communities-of-practice.pdf

 

 

 

 

Module 3.4 Networked Peer Learning

After reading Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder’s (2002). Seven principles for cultivating communities of practice., Topping’s(2005.) Trends in peer learning and Prensky’s (2010) chapter about .Partnering: A pedagogy for the new educational landscape; I created this mind map using the online tool bubbl.us.

https://bubbl.us/?h=2b1e1/555ffa/17WnSTgfp6noE&r=502459054

New-Mind-Map_9l91dvg

References

Topping, K.J. (2005.) Trends in peer learning. Educational Psychology, 25(6), 631–645. Retrievedhttp://www.jesexpertise.be/bibb/bijlagen/trends.pdf

Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Seven principles for cultivating communities of practice. InCultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge (pp. 49-64). Boston: Harvard Business School Press. Retrieved CSU ereserve https://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/ereserve/pdf/wenger-e.pdf

Prensky, M. (2010). Chapter 1. Partnering: A pedagogy for the new educational landscape. In Teaching digital natives: Partnering for real learning (p. 9-30). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Retrieved CSU ereservehttps://www.csu.edu.au/division/library/ereserve/pdf/prensky-m.pdf

Learning theories and a personal approach to networked learning as a connected educator

After reading Siemens (2008), Hodgson, McConnell & Dirckinck-Holmfeld (2012) and Wenger (2012) I have identified numerous learning theories that I believe inform my understanding of networked learning pedagogy. These learning theories are social learning theories like Connectivism, social constructivist theory and the idea of a ‘community of practice’.

These theories emphasise the impact of networked structures in the internet linking people and computers in social networks. Siemens (2008) described how today’s technology facilitates the distribution of knowledge, while at the same time allowing us to “project ourselves outward digitally” (de Kerchove, 1997 ,p.38).I think it is important as a connected educator to do this, but it is often harder to project yourself out there than just observing (or lurking as some describe).

Hodgson, McConnell & Dirckinck-Holmfeld (2012) say that most connected educators or “networked learning practitioners” place a high value on

-co-operation and collaboration

-working as part of a group or community

-“discussion and dialogue”

-self-determination of self-motivation during the learning process

-valuing of differences

-trust and relationships

– the investment of one’s self in the networked learning process

– the role that technology plays in connecting.

I would agree that these factors play a major role in the way I act as a connected educator and help others learn about how they to connect and learn more.

Wenger’s (2012) concept of a ‘community of practice’ working together played a major role in the knowledge artefact I developed for the teaching community of my school to encourage them to learn from each other.

 

References

Hodgson, V., McConnell, D., & Dirckinck-Holmfeld, L. (2012). Chapter 17: The theory, practice and pedagogy of networked learning. In L. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, V. Hodgson & D. McConnell (Eds.), Exploring the theory, pedagogy and practice of networked learning (pp. 291-305). New York, NY, USA: Springer.

Siemens, G. (2008, September 28). A brief history of networked learning. Retrieved fromhttp://elearnspace.org/Articles/HistoryofNetworkLearning.rtf‎

Wenger, E. (2012). Communities of practice: A brief introduction. Retrieved from
http://wenger-trayner.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/06-Brief-introduction-to-communities-of-practice.pdf

Critical Reflection

Becoming that point of centrality….

The future of digital culture depends on how we use it (Rhiengold, 2014) and the future of my career as a teacher librarian (and educator) depends on my capacity to evolve in this ever changing climate of information, innovation and knowledge creation.

Rheingold’s concept of “centrality” and the potential for myself as a teacher-librarian to be a person of centrality in my school’s learning community and networks of knowledge really makes sense to me. I see it as an achievable goal. The time spent this semester participating in this subject: Concepts and Practises for a Digital Age has resulted in a more expanded and detailed understanding of what we are all currently experiencing in what has been described as a technological revolution or the Fourth Revolution – where we are changing our self-understanding (Floridi, 2012).I thought this view was a little too philosophical). ‘Networked Society’ –is what I prefer because it is a simple label recognising the networks that are being made as well as the social aspects of how people interact in digital spaces. Rheingold’s (2014) concept ‘Networked Awareness’’ works with a ‘Networked Society’ because it recognises the potential in being aware on the connections we are making and the ongoing, wonderful potential for creativity, knowledge sharing and innovation.

Through the professional reading that was provided in the modules and in my extended reading, mainly for the assessment tasks; I have increased my knowledge about the ideas and theories shared by  leaders in creativity, technological development, innovators in digital culture, educators ( including some ‘celebrity ‘ like TED talking educators –Sir Robinson) and  an international range of professionals that  have so eloquently explained how networks of knowledge are being developed in this Web 3.0 phase of the World Wide Web.

I have been able to synthesise in my Digital essay about Makerspaces – environments that facilitate innovation in Secondary schools, my knowledge about how; Robinsons (2011) theories about facilitating creativity will engage students in learning, collaboration, connecting and dialogue are powerful in learning in a digital age (Siemens, 2005), and learning through tinkering, making and engineering in Makerspaces could be our big  change to reignite curiosity in young people (Libow Martinez & Stager, 2013).

It is with this new knowledge on board that I have started to change my reaction to the digital culture surrounding me. My perspective is evolving. I have increased my Personal Learning Network significantly using more social media and digital curation tools. My use of Twitter has increased the most. I have found Twitter most beneficial in making connections with other like-minded and some far superior educational professionals. I am then continuing on by sharing new ideas with my learning community in my workplace. Through sharing I am connecting and through connecting I hope to become an innovator.

References

Floridi, L. (2012). The fourth revolution. The Philosopher’s Magazine, 96-101.

Libow Martinez, S., & Stager, G. (2013). Invent to Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom. Torrance: Constructing Modern Knowledge Press.

Rheingold, H. (2014, Februrary). Network Awareness . Retrieved April 2014, from Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/86182564

Robinson, S. K. (2011). Out of Our Minds Learning to be Creative. United Kingdom: Capstone Publishing Ltd.

Siemens, G. (2005). Connectivism:A learning theory for a digital age. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning, 3-10.

“The revolution in asking and answering questions” – Wow!

After seeing Judy’s note ‘don’t miss watching this video’ I thought ok this is going to be interesting. I was not disappointed by the TED talk “The revolution in asking and answering questions”. I was amazed how obvious some of the Daniel Russell’s observations and tips were but I hadn’t thought of approaching Google and its tools like that.  One needs to take into account that it is Russell’s job to investigate and analyze Google users’ habits and practices in an effort to improve the search experience, but it’s all so applicable to classroom use too.

I have accessed Project Gutenberg before for reading books but not to search its text. I have also discussed different genres of websites with students, looked at locations through Google Earth and through our discussions about digital media touched on the use of emoticons.

I hadn’t heard of the Control F technique, or used data sets like Russell illustrates Neither had I tried inserting a picture into the Google search bar.

A few key messages that I took away from this video are

•Teachers and students need to frame questions differently and we need to query reality.

•The importance of basic skills  like

“Learning how to ask the right question &

Know what tools exist to help answer questions.”

•Stay curious – all of us.

This is definitely being shared with my school’s teaching community.

Russell, D. (2014, April 29). The revolution in asking and answering questions. Retrieved May 19, 2014, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaRYiu1HNck&feature=youtu.be