‘Beware of Online Filter Bubbles’: an important video to view

Watching the TED talk ‘Beware of Online Filter Bubbles’by Eli Pariser reinforced for me the important role of the teacher-librarian in schools and also network and social media literacy (Rheingold,2010).   As a connected educator I need to be aware of where I sit in the internet, how my choices (of what I am clicking) effect the information I am viewing.  I have noticed regularly on Facebook and Twitter the number of suggested or similar posts come up.

you and internet Capture

(Pariser,2013)

The information conveyed by Pariser reinforces too all the warnings we give to students about overusing Google. if they keep on clicking on “junk food ” sites they are going to get more “junk food” sites next search.  Students’s ‘crap detection’ radars are going to have to work double time.

In the last twelve months in my role of as a teacher-librarian I have been using Peartrees to curate sites for topics that are taught.  We then catalogue these collections in our Library catalogue. There has been mostly positive responses to us doing this. A few teachers have complained that the students should find the sites themselves. It is my view that if the student bothers to find the Library’s curated collection and use the sites, its a good thing. The sites can act as a beginning point and may be a lot better than those that are being blocked by their own “filter bubble”. Hopefully my curated collections meet the Pariser’s recommendations for internet sites.

filter bubble important Capture

(Pariser, 2013)

pearltree collection Capture

Pearltree curated collections

Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention and 21st-century social media literacies. Educase review, 14-24.

“The revolution in asking and answering questions” – Wow!

After seeing Judy’s note ‘don’t miss watching this video’ I thought ok this is going to be interesting. I was not disappointed by the TED talk “The revolution in asking and answering questions”. I was amazed how obvious some of the Daniel Russell’s observations and tips were but I hadn’t thought of approaching Google and its tools like that.  One needs to take into account that it is Russell’s job to investigate and analyze Google users’ habits and practices in an effort to improve the search experience, but it’s all so applicable to classroom use too.

I have accessed Project Gutenberg before for reading books but not to search its text. I have also discussed different genres of websites with students, looked at locations through Google Earth and through our discussions about digital media touched on the use of emoticons.

I hadn’t heard of the Control F technique, or used data sets like Russell illustrates Neither had I tried inserting a picture into the Google search bar.

A few key messages that I took away from this video are

•Teachers and students need to frame questions differently and we need to query reality.

•The importance of basic skills  like

“Learning how to ask the right question &

Know what tools exist to help answer questions.”

•Stay curious – all of us.

This is definitely being shared with my school’s teaching community.

Russell, D. (2014, April 29). The revolution in asking and answering questions. Retrieved May 19, 2014, from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaRYiu1HNck&feature=youtu.be