Critical Reflection on INF537

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As I reflect on this final capstone subject in this highly challenging, varied and so highly relevant degree, I have a sense of professional growth and achievement. Digital Futures Colloquium has contributed to the affirmation, integration and synthesis of ideas from the three other subjects I studied. We have covered aspects of teaching practices for the digital age, designing spaces for learning, design thinking, makerspaces, knowledge networks, digital scholarship and participatory learning.

Two years ago when I began this course I stated that my aim was to be a teacher librarian who can lead a community of learners into a digital world, enjoying opportunities to collaborate, create and help learners use new digital media. I feel confident to do this now because I am a highly networked and digitally literate educator who learns autonomously as I interact with digital media. Being able to understand how digital literacy and scholarship works allows me to design learning experiences and spaces where a school community can develop these skills too. I have the future work skills to ensure that I can add value to the technology that we use as learners and educators.

It has been easy to see how I in my role as a teacher librarian can integrate my understandings of learning in a digital age into my everyday practice. I know that the school library program plays a major role in promoting current pedagogy, adoption of technology, leveraging technology, promoting participatory learning, digital scholarship and digital citizenship.

My digital scholarship skills increased through the practice of research, sharing and refining ideas, reading and responding to blog posts, e-books and websites. Many of the professional readings have been highly appropriate to share with my colleagues and have had a major influence on the ideas that shape my practice.

IFTF_FutureWorkSkillsSummary_01                        2015-K-12-Report-Topics-Graphic-1024x794

My final assessment, a case study addressed the question “Do students become more autonomous as learners when they independently publish digital artefacts online?” and it’s major themes and findings about digital literacy, future work skills and the development of an agile approach to working in a digital age, allowed me to take the first step in leading the school community to match the trends, challenges in the adoption of technology.

This case study provided an opportunity to practice digital scholarship skills with survey design, communication and analysis. Through the use of technology tools, I examined and created many examples of digital media.  I correlated the recommendations for digital learning with my data and could see a pattern of behaviours which could inform better practice. I was pleased that I could see a real pathway for changing the way technology can be adopted in my school community.

In the future the connections in my personal learning network will remain vitally important to ongoing professional growth. Through the digital colloquiums in this subject I have widened this network and seen how others are working in an agile and sharp manner to leverage technology in schools and other learning environments. Listening to the likes of Annabel Astbury and Cathie Howie were excellent opportunities to engage with other professionals who  work together with educators to facilitate the best learning possible in a digital age. A very appropriate collection of ideas that I intend to use to inform my practice was Judy O’Connell’s recent presentation “Developing Agile Approaches in a Digital Age”. This presentation puts the school library centre stage in this approach.

judy agile approach My fellow students and lecturers have been a great source of collaboration and participatory learning. We have continued to engage in the backchannel of Twitter to support our learning and also respond and share through the subject discussion forums. This participation is vital to online learning and results in more ideas, resources, knowledge networks and global connections resulting in digital innovation for learners.

Participatory Learning in a Library Program

If participatory learning is manifested most profoundly in the maker movement, then school libraries are in the box seat. Teacher-librarians can “hack the curriculum” and provide varied opportunities for school community to design, create and share in the Library spaces and the rest of the school.

Opportunities to engage in the design thinking process, including trialling, prototyping and failing are still far and few between in schools. A makerspace can provide a safe place for self directed designing, creating and learning.

I am about to begin this journey of starting a makerspace movement in the school where I work in the role of the teacher-librarian and a thought leader. It’s time to become a “maker-teacher”: I don’t know how to code, program or make electrical circuits, but I do know who to ask to work with me, how to facilitate students to work together and how to connect with others and find out what to do. I am crafty, but need to practice making more technical creations.

The next step on with a school makerspace will be to show students how to share and make their creations public. To develop the students into true contributing digital citizens the teaching community may need to redefine our approach to digital literacy. A lot more conversations need to be had about how to change the environment on the web responsively and creatively. Blogs, wikis and other web 2.0 tools need to be named participatory media not ‘new media’ (they have been around for years now). Proven successes like to YOUmedia and Dream Yard projects look very exciting: they provide great opportunities for student-centred learning.

Digital badges are an interesting concept and remind me a bit of the MOOC concept where it can be open to everyone to engage, learn and succeed. It could be a great way of connecting people to expertise. I think it will take a while to shift attitudes to the type of assessments we provide.

 

INF532 Evaluative Report

a) An evaluative statement using the networked learning experiences documented on your Thinkspace blog as evidence of meeting the learning objectives of this subject

Educators need to understand the social nature of knowledge networks and the production of information to lead the members of their school communities on a process from being “knowledgeable to knowledge-able” (Wesch, 2010). Throughout this subject Knowledge Networking for Educators INF532 using my blog as a place of reflection, thought and creation I have come to understand more about the nature of information, social networks, information management, learning with digital tools and the value of a personal learning network.

In my first blog post for INF532 I wrote about being a student studying these new models of information (McQueen,2015 March 17) I wanted to attain more knowledge and skills about encouraging my learning community to create content, facilitating great learning (for all), preservation (& curation) of information and expand my Personal learning Network (PLN) and Personal Learning Environment (PLE). I have not been disappointed by the experiences that followed in this subject.

New models of information based on the technology tools of blogs, social media and global communication have had an exponential growth effect on content creation and seen the transformation of existing information formats. Blog posts now can be seen as credible sources of information for e.g. The Huffington Post (De Saulles, 2012). Blogs are going to form a major part of my future PLE in the future; using  the tool Feedly to follow blogs more effectively and strategically is a great starting point (McQueen, 2015 May 29).

Educators and our students are operating in a world where there is a new culture of learning. It’s a culture of learning where we can easily access unlimited resources and amazing technological tools, where learning can be ‘real’ in nearly every area of education and our lives (Thomas & Brown, 2011). This subject encourages educators to examine this culture and try to work out ways to cultivate it, helping others best learn and develop skills to continue learn in many contexts; digital, social and those that don’t even exist yet. I share many progressive thinking educators’ view that schools’ progression into this new culture of learning is being hindered and not supported by many aspects in our educational system (McQueen, 2015 March 21).

However as leaders in educational pedagogy we must take advantage of opportunities to show others how learning environments can be designed differently.  We need to take advantage of the diverse, collective nature of the new learning culture where others can learn from each other (Thomas & Brown, 2011) In Assessment item 2 for this subject I planned and designed a knowledge artefact to instruct my school teaching community about how a teaching team can benefit from developing an online community of practice (McQueen, 2015 March 22). The knowledge networking concepts that I addressed in the artefact were ‘communities of practice’ (Wenger, 2006), ‘participatory cultures’ (Rheingold, Participation Power, 2012), ‘networked learning’ (Richardson & Mancabelli, 2011)and ‘social media literacies’ (Rheingold, 2010). The process of creating this artefact was time consuming, but the persistence in learning to use new tools was worthwhile in the end. I took time during this process to research instructional design techniques that were relevant to adult learners’ needs (Moloney, 2010). The exegesis about this knowledge artefact summarised the purpose and impact of my artefact in supporting knowledge networking in my school’s community of teachers (McQueen, 2015 May 31).The opportunity to observe and critique another colleague’s knowledge artefact provided feedback and access to these artefacts for further use and also practice in the art of evaluating instructional design elements (McQueen, 2015 May 27).

INF532 has facilitated many opportunities to develop a suite of new media tools for information management, content creation, content curation, collaborative work.  I have tried out new tools like Listly (McQueen, 2015 May 29), Feedly (McQueen, 2015 March 21), Pixabay (McQueen 2015 May 31), and persevered with some of my existing tools like groups Diigo and Pinterest to use them more widely. My ever expanding use of Twitter though has been the most influential in developing my PLN.   The power of participation (Rheingold, Participation Power, 2012)was recently made evident when some recent new ideas on the planning of a new Library spaces were amplified via Twitter. Linking information with hashtags and connecting with influential others makes the sharing of good ideas easy. Facilitating these connections leads to the feeling of being a ‘connected educator’ or even leader (McQueen, 2015 May 29).

Pariser’s (2013) talk about “online filter bubbles” highlighted the importance of not only the way networks are influential and monitored in the internet but also the place of educators and especially teacher-librarians to be content curators. Using social curation tools like Pearltrees, Listly, and Pinterest are ways for connected educators to curate and share at the same time (McQueen, 2015 May 22).

Taking time to consider a better future direction in education, so we can support connected learners led to a closer investigation of flipped teaching (McQueen, 2015 May 29) .Amplifying learning using digital tools like Skype, Twitter and Google Hangouts is a simple but effective way of engaging learners and broadcasting their knowledge and created content (McQueen, 2015 May 29). Augmented reality is another new form of engaging connected learners which warrants further investigation (McQueen, 2015 May 28).

INF532 and the reflective blog I continued to contribute to, has provided the networked experiences which have collectively and creatively have made me a much more connected educator.

b) A reflective statement on your development as a connected educator as a result of studying INF532, and the implications for your role as a ‘connected leader’ within your school community, and/or at district/state/national level

To be a connected educator one must first understand what it means to be a learner within our (digital) connected work and also examine them as educator (Nussbaum-Beach & Hall, 2012).  As a result of studying INF532 I have developed an understanding of how knowledge networks form, can be facilitated and encouraged to flourish and also examine myself as a (connected) educator.

In the beginning of INF532 I reflected on my status as a connected educator (McQueen, 2015 April 6). Whilst engaging in Nussbaum-Beach & Hall’s (2012)reflection activity I identified a need for me collaborate with a wider group of people more often especially those teachers and students  at my own school, engage students in real-life and global situations and make learning environments richer in technology.  I have always been a learner leader in my academic groups, school and district community but I obviously needed to connect more; outside (not just in an academic manner) and within my school community. I can say that I have become more collaborative through content creation, sharing and connective with others over the last semester. Throughout INF532 I have learnt the rules of good and effective content curation (McQueen, 2015 May 23), the power in participation to build a PLN (McQueen, 2015 May 29) and how my pedagogy that I bring to my practice has progressively shifted.  I recently checked in with my social media literacy skills (Rheingold, Attention and 21st-century social media literacies, 2010) and found that yes they are interconnected and more refined (McQueen,2015 May 31).

A big learning curve and confidence boost as a connected educator happened when I uploaded my very own knowledge networking artefact to YouTube: How can a teaching team benefit from developing an online community of practice , shared it in Twitter and then bravely with my own school’s teaching community. The process of writing the exegesis and assessing others helped reinforce the important of using such artefacts to lead communities in building knowledge networks (McQueen, 2015, May 31 & 27).

The mindset that “we must take up the challenge on designing the future of education” (rather than dream or dread it) can lead to exciting prospects for the future of leaning (2Revolutions, 2012). The future design of schools and education requires a shift from hierarchical to networked learning to be able to be lifelong learners. Connected educators and leaders who understand these concepts are needed in schools to ensure that learning that happens in their schools is future proof (Schravemade, 2015). Establishing and setting purposes for these knowledge networks is an important part of this process too(McQueen, 2015 May 23).

In taking up this challenge, I will need to continue to try new tools and strategies, expand my PLN, create new content, share and curate content, and support connected learners. At the end of INF532 I shared some ideas for my future endeavours; they range from more complex curating, to public blogging and amplifying learning globally (McQueen, 2015 May 30).

The implications for my role as a connected leader will happen in my classrooms physical and digital), school, district and even globally. Teacher-Librarians play an important role because “they are intrinsically linked to effective and responsive information curation and dissemination in distributed environments within and beyond the school” (O’Connell, 2011) I feel a responsibly to lead the design for change in my local and global communities. I am lucky I have a supportive Principal who believes teacher librarians can be game changers. I have always felt that Libraries and their leaders and staff have opportunities to be the antidote to those aspects that our education systems have not got quite right. The study I have done so far in this degree and INF532 has provided me with a seat at the table to join in and lead conversations about new designs for learning in our schools.

I listened with interest to Greg Green, the Principal who ‘flipped’ his whole school. It didn’t happen overnight. He connected with a small group of like-minded educators who could see a more effective way of teachers and students working together to facilitate better learning.  They were a  group of innovative educators, they tried out new tools, shared their ideas and success; others caught on (November, 2011). Now Green and his team have redesigned the learning and their students have developed life-long learning skills. This is knowledge networking and designing better education practices at its best.

As a connected educator who now has skills in creating knowledge networks I can design better education practices too and in the process support and lead connected learners on any scale: local to global. I can lead them in the use and organisation of information, sharing of ideas, learning and the creation of knowledge.

Bibliography

2Revolutions. (2012, March). The Future of Learning. Retrieved May 2015, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoSJ3_dZcm8

De Saulles, M. (2012). New models of information production. In M. De Saulles, Information 2.0: new models of information production, distribution and consumption (pp. 13-35). London: Facet.

McQueen. (2015, May 22). ‘Beware of Online Filter Bubbles’: an important video to view. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/22/beware-of-online-filter-bubbles-an-important-video-to-view/

McQueen. (2015, May 29). A tool for gathering, organising and making the most of blog posts:Feedly. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/a-new-tool-for-gathering-organising-and-making-the-most-of-blog-posts-feedly/

McQueen, M. (2015). Retrieved 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 28). A case study: using augmented reality to amplify learning in the school library program. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/28/a-case-study-of-using-augmented-reality-to-amplify-learning-in-the-school-library-program/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 31). A check up on my 21st-Century social media literacy and participatory skills. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/31/a-check-up-on-my-21st-century-social-media-literacy-and-participatory-skills/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 29). A flipped school!! Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/a-flipped-school/

McQueen, M. (2015, March 22). A knowledge building project. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/03/22/a-knowledge-building-project/

McQueen, M. (2015, March 21). A new culture of learning. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/03/21/a-new-culture-of-learning/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 27). An amplified learning idea to try out – connecting over books & reading. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/27/an-amplified-learning-idea-to-try-out-connecting-over-books-reading/

McQueen, M. (2015, March 15). Being a student -new models of information. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/03/17/being-a-student-new-models-of-information/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 27). Critique of Greg Miller’s artefact ‘using twitter to grow your PLN’. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog.

McQueen, M. (2015, May 30). It’s important to try new things…. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/30/its-important-to-try-new-things/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 31). Knowledge networking artefact & exegesis. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/31/knowledge-networking-artefact/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 23). Knowledge networks: establishing and setting purposes. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/23/knowledge-networks-establishing-and-setting-purposes/

McQueen, M. (2015, April 6). Reflections on “defining the connected educator”. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/04/06/reflections-on-defining-the-connected-educator/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 23). The ideal content curation practice. Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/23/the-ideal-content-curation-practice/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 29). The power in participation. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s reflective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/the-power-in-participation/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 29). Trying out a different digital curation tool – Listly. Retrieved May 2015, from Monique’s refective blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/29/trying-out-a-different-digital-curation-tool-listly/

McQueen, M. (2015, May 22). What pedagogical and content knowledge do you bring to your practice? Retrieved June 2015, from Monique’s Reflective Blog: http://thinkspace.csu.edu.au/monique/2015/05/22/what-pedagogical-and-content-knowledge-do-you-bring-to-your-practice/

Moloney, K. (2010). There is no excuse for bad instructional design. Training and development in Australia, 22-23.

November, A. (2011). Learn from a school that has completely flipped out – An interview with Greg Green on flipped learning model. [podcast]. Retrieved May 2015, from November Learning Podcast Series: http://novemberlearning.com/an-interview-with-greg-green-on-flipped-learning-model/

Nussbaum-Beach, S., & Hall, L. (2012). Defining the connected educator. In S. Nussbaum-Beach, & L. Hall, The connected educator: Learning and leading in a digital age (pp. 3-24). Bloomington: Solution Tree Press.

O’Connell, J. (2011, October). Teacher librarians are important. Retrieved June 2015, from Hey jude living in an online world: http://judyoconnell.com/2011/10/27/teacher-librarians-are-important/

Pariser, E. (2013, March). Beware online “filter bubbles” – Eli Pariser. Retrieved May 2015, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4w48Ip-KPRs&feature=youtu.be

Rheingold, H. (2010). Attention and 21st-century social media literacies. Educase review, 14-24.

Rheingold, H. (2012). Participation Power. In H. Rheingold, Net smart: how to thrive online (pp. 111-139). USA: MIT Press.

Richardson, W., & Mancabelli, R. (2011). The power of networked learning. In W. Richardson, & R. Mancabelli, Personal learning networks: using the power of conections to transform education (pp. 1-14). Moorabbin: Solution Tree Press.

Schravemade, K. (2015, May). From hierarchical to networked:ensuring lifeready and lifeworthy learning in the digital age. Retrieved May 2015, from katschravdigitalessayinf530: http://katschravdigitalessayinf530.weebly.com/

Thomas, D., & Brown, J. (2011). Arc-of-life learning. In D. Thomas, & J. Brown, A new culture of learning: cultivating imagination for a world of constant change (pp. 17-33). Lexington,KY: CreateSpace.

Wenger, E. (2006). Communities of practice a brief introduction. Retrieved April 2015, from http://wenger-trayner.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/06-Brief-introduction-to-communities-of-practice.pdf

Wesch, M. (2010, October). From knowledgeable to knowledge-able. Retrieved May 2015, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeaAHv4UTI8&feature=youtu.be

A new tool for gathering, organising and making the most of blog posts: Feedly

feedly icon    One of my goals was to start following some blogs properly in a more organised manner. I want to develop my knowledge, make more connections and interact with other connected educators. I decided I should focus my exploration on three main areas; Libraries, Makerspaces and Contemporary Learning. I consulted the collective knowledge of Twitter, got a few re-tweets and an answer from a respected colleague that Feedly  was worth a try to collate my blog feeds.  I found Feedly very easy to use, I do find that once you use a few digital tools one’s digital literacy skills build up and you take to new tools a bit easier each time. Quality over quantity is going to be my motto. I am pleased about how it’s going so far.

feedly screen capture

A case study: using augmented reality to amplify learning in the school library program

I first came across this example of immersive augmented reality in a school library activity when I saw it’s creators down for leading a session at next week’s EduTECH  conference. Two local teacher-librarians Anne Weaver from All Hallows and  Cathy Oxley from Brisbane Boys Grammar teamed together to organise an immersive, augmented reality role play fantasy quest. This activity was set to be performed in a park, but due to the weather it happened inside the library. Working in teams and reading instructions the students participated in challenges amplified by the immersion in numerous augmented fantasy virtual worlds and scenes. As well as promoting fantasy fiction and reading, this experience integrated augmented reality in a really authentic and entertaining manner. I think its great for engaging young adult learners. Anne Weaver has a post on her blog about this innovative learning activity.

augmentedhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immersion_(virtual_reality)

 

An amplified learning idea to try out – connecting over books & reading

SLJ1301_GoodReads

I was inspired whilst looking at Shannon McKlintock Miller’s blog post describing the way she facilitates opportunities for  authors to connect with her readers to continue integrating technology into our Library program at my school workplace. Shannon has worked with illustrators and authors.

I have been planning on introducing Book Clubs for both Middle and Senior school students. I want to spend time engaging with high quality  and exciting new literature with these students. Tristan Banck’s novel “Two Wolves” is book that has been nominated for this years CBCA Book of the Year Awards. It has had excellent reviews and I think both girls and boys would enjoy it. I do know Tristan Bancks following several visits he has made to our school – I have to ask him first if he’s keen to participate in this idea. I am planning on using this book as our first Middle School Book Club book. After we read and discuss it together I thought we could meet up via Skype or Google Hangout with Tristan and discuss the book. I have a great screen in the Library that we could all sit around, connect and share knowledge. I look forward to trying this out.

I am also  really looking forward to hearing Shannon McKlintock Miller speak at EduTECH next week. Exciting times!

6 New Tools

I have chosen 6 new tools to try out,  start using and get involved in over the next month ( and beyond).

I don’t follow or comment on many blogs or wikis. I am going to choose ones that are relevant to my work in school libraries.

The first is the TL virtual cafe       http://tlvirtualcafe.wikispaces.com/

I am keen to learn more about Makerspaces so I am going to follow some blogs on this topic

http://jchild.edublogs.org/

I will seek out more blogs about Makerspaces. I think here might be a good starting point http://renovatedlearning.com/makerspace-resources/

Content curation is a skill I want to develop. I have a login to Scoopit, but don’t use it. I want to use Pinterest more. I would like to share want I curate through my Twitter account.

To help organise my reading I am going to start using a reader program – Google reader or Diigo.

LinkedIn is something I hear other educators praise . I am thinking it may be worth more investigation.

New Models of Information Production

As the Internet continues to grow and evolve it has become obvious that our interactions with the internet are going to become more and more personalised and customised. I’m not sire though that I want companies such as FaceBook, Linked In and Google to follow me so carefully. Yes I would agree that people generally have more devices, combine this with the way we are using the internet to distribute information and there is no surprise that some companies are taking advantage of this type of behaviour.

Blogs. Blogs continue to be criticised by some, including fellow educators who have not realised the potential in the benefits of public reflection. I along with other students have experienced the knowledge creation that can come through sharing blog posts and comments. I am a fan of The Huffington Post because the articles are interesting and relevant to me. It remains a challenge though in my experiences to get students and other teachers to take on blogging and wikis. I have been trying for 5 years. They need to see value. Some students and teachers still are only driven my assessments. Maybe we need to start assessing their knowledge that is being created in these networks. As an organisation we are now tapping into the potential of social networking and social media.

More reflections to come…

 

 

Assignment 6 Part B:Critical Reflection INF536

The commencement of this subject ‘Designing Spaces for Learning’ correlated with opportunities at my workspace to put my design thinking skills to the test.  My Leadership team at my school were noticing that I had valuable insights to share and I was ready to join them on a design process to design some new physical spaces in the school.

Personally I have learnt the value of observing environments and people to make better choices and decisions. I appreciate good service, functional spaces and the value of listening to users.

The nature of the Blog tasks encouraged me to realise the potential in changing the learning spaces to encourage collaboration, creativeness and newness.

Very early in the semester after reading Kuratko’s The design-thinking process in Innovation acceleration: transforming organizational thinking.(2012) I began to recognise the value in collaboration, involving stakeholders in decision making  and developing a common language  abut design.  In preparation for initial talks about our school’s new Library design I developed a Flickr page where all stakeholders could add and observe images of Libraries they liked. I also helped transform and guide their thinking by sharing the principles from Kuratko (2012) and Brown (2009). What eventuated were  new, varied and many ideas! My library assistant even came up with a complete design and was included in the discussions with the leadership team and architect. This was a great example of participatory design (Woolner, 2009).

Following on from this positive experience I then began to frame my ideas for learning spaces in a more defined manner. My first attempt was to write a design brief for the new library using Kurtako’s (2012) recommendations as a guideline. The next design brief I wrote was for the entrance of our school (Blog task 3): for the first time ever I used Stanford d.school’s How might we?… Method.  This simple change in framing the design brief really allowed be to come up with new ideas and contemplate the unknowns (Hatchuel,2004).

I have come to realise, partly through recently completing the Case Study on changes that have happened in our digital learning space that I can use my understanding of the design process, design thinking approaches, creative culture and the importance of recognising the influences and interactions of learning pedagogy, space and technology (Wilson & Randall, 2012) to reflect on past practices and make better decisions during future design projects.

Digital design is an aspect of education where I can see a lot of potential for innovation. The different online spaces like  McIntosh’s (2010)‘Seven Spaces’ , Thornburg’s(2014)campfires, watering holes, caves, life spaces and then Runnquist’s(2011) mountain-top spaces  has helped me identify new ideas that are yet to be integrated in our developing online spaces.

I feel more motivated now to facilitate a creative culture in my educational organisation and beyond. I know I am able to facilitate conversations about creative culture after a successful creative coffee morning. I do notice sometimes that the ’Status Quo’ and pragmatism  in education organisations can challenge one’s ability to be creative when changing learning spaces, but I think that a better understanding of approaches like design thinking will help me contribute to transforming the future schools that I work in and have an impact on student’s learning.

References

Brown, T. (2009). Change by design: How design thinking transforms organisations. Harper Business.

D.school, Stanford University, How might we?… Method Card: http://dschool.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/HMW-METHODCARD.pdf Accessed March 1, 2014

Hatchuel, A., Le Masson, P., & Weil, B. (2004). CK theory in practice: lessons from industrial applications. In DS 32: Proceedings of DESIGN 2004, the 8th International Design Conference, Dubrovnik, Croatia.http://www.designsociety.org/download-publication/19760/c-k_theory_in_practice_lessons_from_industrial_applications

Kuratko, D., Goldsworthy, M., & Hornsby, G. (2012). The design-thinking process in Innovation accerlation: transforming organisational thinking. Boston: Pearson.

McIntosh, E. (2010). Clicks and Bricks: How Schools Buiidlings Influence Future Practice and Technology Adoption. Educational Facility Planner, Volume 45, Issues 1 & 2.

Runnquist, A. (2011). Learning envrionments based on learning. Retrieved October 2014, from Vittrabloggen: http://vittrabloggen.wordpress.com/2011/05/25/vittra-telefonplan-environments-based-on-learning/

Thornburg, D. D. (2014, March). From the Campfire to the Holodeck, How Place Matters in Education. Retrieved October 2014, from Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tx1cAQREVls

Wilson, G., & Randall, M. (2012). The implementation and evaluation of a new learning space: a pilot study. Research in Learning Technology, Vol.20.

Woolner, P. (2009). Building schools for the future through participatory design process: exploring the issues and investigating ways forward. BERA 2009. Manchester.

Blog Task 3

I continue to enjoy reading everyone’s blog posts via the Blog Roll.

I have left a comment on Trish Buckley’s post The desire to lurk versus the value of participating.

Trish, I want to change from a lurker to a leader.  Before beginning this course I had just dipped my toe into Social Media, I tended to have a look around, a good think, use a few ideas but wasn’t confident to share a lot or publish. I had only published what I had to for post graduate study purposes. What I found was that I didn’t feel connected to the communities I was observing.

I too have observed the sometimes negative on goings on OZTLnet. I have used that forum personally only to ask about a specific resource. The negative on goings I have observed have often occurred by misunderstandings and assumptions. I agree with you that we need to be very careful about what we do publish.

My use of Twitter for my PLN has exploded tenfold over the last two weeks. I chose to focus on one type of social media to begin with and went with Twitter because it is so widely used and we were using it already for our TweetMeets .I watched for a day or two, retweeted some great posts and then after participating in a Tweet Meet put my hand up and have since constructed a few tweets or made comments on sites. One of my Tweets got retweeted by SCIS – I was surprised how pleased I was. I am being followed by more people and am using it to connect with others. I have chosen to keep Twitter for mainly professional use.

Rheingold as included in our introduction to Module 3 says that the future of digital culture depends on how we use it. We are all digital citizens who do have a responsibility to contribute to knowledge networks in a fair and productive manner.

I have made small attempts at engaging students to use social media like tools at school. I have been surprised how hesitant older students are. They will share nearly everything out of school but once it is in the school environment they ask questions like “Do we have to? Is it being assessed? Who is seeing this information?”. Maybe they don’t think it’s cool. I am now going to take a refreshed and motivated new attempt as I am now understand the benefits even more through the modules we have been studying.

Rheingold, H. (2014, Februrary). Network Awareness . Retrieved April 2014, from Vimeo: http://vimeo.com/86182564

I also commented on Andrew Pinelli’s post Knowledge Networks.

I too found the Introduction to Module 3 engaging. I think coming off the end of all our research for the Scholarly Book review and some thinking time after Modules 1 &  2 we can all see where the concepts (including Rheingold’s ideas) fit in.

During the research for my review of Ken Robinson’s: Out of Our Minds” I came across an interesting Australian study Developing creativity: Aligning community, learning and teaching practices by Swirski, Wood and Solomindides (2008) which outlined the importance of communities where “knowledge creation” takes place. They defined creativity as “the capability to respond to change by analysing, applying and expanding knowledge.”( Swirski et.al., 2008 p. 320) and  Knowledge creation” – the ability to select, apply and expand knowledge. They explained that in communities where collaboration is valued, there was an increase in the complexity and relevance of resources that assist in creative, innovative outcomes (and knowledge creation).

I think the publication of the findings and conclusions of knowledge creations in open ways on the net has a big impact on the perception that more knowledge and innovative thought are occurring. Also it is highly possible that the increasing complexity and diversity of the knowledge networks due to the interactive nature is having a positive effect on the quality of knowledge being created.

Swirski, T., Wood, L. & Solomonides,I (2008). Developing creativity:Aligning community, learning and teaching practise. Engagaing Communities. Proceedings of 31st HERSDSA Annual Conference, 318-328.