ETL 505 Assignment 2 Part A SCIS Subject Heading Exercises

Assignment Part A SCIS Subject Heading Exercises

(20 marks, 4 marks/item)

Using the following tools:

  • SCIS Subject Headings
  • SCIS Standards for Cataloguing and Data Entry, Section 4 and Appendix A
  • SCIS Catalogue
  • Guidelines to using SCIS Subject Headings

To assign SCIS standard subject headings for the following five topics. Write the subject headings as they would appear on bibliographic records in the SCIS Catalogue (except there is no need to underline your subject headings, to add ‘scisshl,’ at the end of the headings, or to include ‘scot’ headings). Clearly describe the decisions made and process followed in determining/deriving each of the subject headings. Why did you make these decisions? Give evidence and support for your answersCarefully read the marking criteria for this section as well.

(Approximately 200 words per item.)

Provide a reference list of tools used and works consulted in one list for all at the end of the assignment.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________My marks

Resource 1

A history of foreign language radio broadcasts on the Wagga Wagga community radio station 2AAAFM. A significant theme in this work is the use made of the broadcasts in language classes in local schools.

2AAAFM (Radio station: Wagga Wagga, N.S.W.) – History

There are no notes at the heading ‘Radio stations’ in SCIS Subject Headings however, Part 6.1 in SCIS, 2011 indicates that proper names can be created ‘without an instruction to do so’. The proper name is 2AAAFM.

Part 2.3.2.3 in SCIS 2015 indicates that qualifiers are frequently used for many proper names. Appendix A in SCIS Standards for Cataloguing and Data Entry gives the appropriate form for the qualifier for a named radio station.

Radio in Education

The term radio broadcasts is a non-allowed term, as per SCIS, 2011, each non-allowed term or phrase has a reciprocal USE reference directing the user to the allowed heading. Non-allowed terms with USE references are not shown in bold typeface. The USE reference for radio broadcasts directs users to the allowed term Radio in Education. The scope note for this term confirms that this subject heading is allocated to works on the use of radio as a teaching method such as this.

Local – History

This resource indicates that a significant theme is its use in local schools. Therefore the scope note for this subject heading confirms that it can be used for works on the collection and storage of local history materials – being how local schools used these broadcasts.

Wagga Wagga, (N.S.W) – History

According to SEN at SCHISSH Local – History, as well as Section 5.3 (SCIS, 2015), in assigning subject headings referring to place, the most specific names of cities and towns is to be used with the subdivision History.

 

Resource 2

A book of photographs depicting Australia’s military involvement in the war in Iraq in 2003.

Australia. Army-History

The main subject within this resource is the Australian military. The BT at SCISSH confirms that the subject heading ‘Australia. Army-History’ is to be used as the main subject heading, however the broader term recognised is ‘Australia – History, Military’.

War Photography

The UF at SCISSH confirms that the subject heading ‘War Photography’ is used for ‘ Military Photography’.

Iraq War, 2003-2010

The IN for this subject heading as per SCISSH confirms that it may be subdivided like World War, 1939-1945. Even though the book of photography only focuses on the year 2003, as per the guidelines (SCIS, 2011) in section 6.5.4 ‘Period Subdivisions’, it states that ‘SCIS is guided by the broad period spans found in the history schedules of Dewey Decimal Classification and Relative Index’.

 

Resource 3

A collection of sayings, on the themes of love, courtship and marriage, drawn from the novels of Jane Austen. An example of one such saying is, “It is truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

Literature Collections

The UF term at SCISSH confirms that this subject heading may be used for collections containing extracts, just like this resource. The narrower terms also identifies quotations and romances, both of which are highlighted in the resource description.

Love Stories

Jane Austen is typically known for her romantic love stories. Therefore this genre heading is suitable to assign, particularly as this resource has themes of love, courtship and marriage. The scope note for this genre heading states that it is to be used for works of fiction including fictional films which are primarily about romantic love. Works in the genre include…Austen, Jane.

Austen, Jane – Adaptations

Section 6.6 SCIS, 2011 notes that model headings enable similar headings to have the same set of subdivisons applied where necessary. Example, Shakespeare, William has several subdivisions attached to enable an efficient search by users. Therefore the above subject heading assigned, as per section 6.6 may be devised by the cataloguer if needed. Adaptations is appropriate here as it can be used for extracts and paraphrases as well, which then can be used for quotations.

 

Resource 4

Gone missing! (title). A picture book in which the fictional story is told through a series of pictorial puzzles. The story is set in Dunedin in New Zealand where the Australian Rugby Union team has gone missing before a game against the New Zealand All Blacks. Dick Tracy, the famous fictional detective, teams up with the New Zealand police to solve the mystery and get the Australian team to the match on time. The Book won the Sports World Award for Fiction for Boys.

Dunedin, (NZ) – History

This story is set in Dunedin, a town in New Zealand. According to SEN at SCHISSH Local – History, as well as Section 5.3 (SCIS, 2015), in assigning subject headings referring to place, the most specific names of cities and towns is to be used with the subdivision History.

Rugby Union – Fiction

As per SCIS, 2015 section 5.5, ‘Themes in Fiction’ confirms that the Australian Rugby Union team is a specific theme that is entitled to be identified as a subject heading.

Picture books

The scope note for this subject heading confirms that it is to be used for fiction and non-fiction where the theme or subject matter is communicated primarily by pictures.

Illustration of books

With reference to ‘pictorial puzzles’, according to this scope note, this would be classed as a technique and therefore would be assigned under ‘Illustration of books’.

Sports World Award for Fiction for Boys

Under section 5.6 ‘Literary prizes’ SCIS 2011, resources that have won a literary prize are assigned the name of that prize as a subject heading.

Wallabies (Rugby Union Team) – Fiction

Under section 6 in the SCIS guidelines, headings that may be devised by the cataloguer consist of:

  1. proper names, for example names of individuals, peoples, places, organisations and projects
  2. common names belonging to well-known categories including sport, food, animals, chemicals, plants and vehicles.

Therefore, Wallabies has been assigned as a subject heading for this resource as it aligns with this. However, it also needs a qualifier as wallabies could also be noted as the animal, which in this case it isn’t.

New Zealand All Blacks (Rugby Union Team) – Fiction

‘Headings for proper names may be devised whenever appropriate, without an instruction to do so’ (SCIS, 2011) in section 6.1. Therefore New Zealand All Blacks would be assigned as it is an association such as a club or society. The long dash indicates a subdivision, ‘Fiction’ is the pertinent standard subdivision as confirmed by the specific example note at the heading ‘Fiction’ which indicates that this term can be used as a subdivision ‘to give access to topics within works of fiction’. Again a qualifier would need to be used to specify what team it is in reference to as New Zealand has many sporting teams named All Blacks.

Whilst the overview of this resource highlights the name of the famous fictional detective, Dick Tracy, it is current SCIS policy not to assign headings for fictional characters in works of fiction as stated in section 5.2 of SCIS 2015.

 

Resource 5

A biography of Annie Gunn, the first love of John Curtin who later became prime minster of Australia. The work examines the possible long term impact on John Curtin of Annie Gunn’s untimely death.

Gunn, Annie – Biography

Annie Gunn is the primary subject of this resource and therefore this subject heading is instinctively assigned. As per SEN at SCISSH biography, the individual who is the subject of the work is assigned an additional heading with their name.

Australia – Prime Ministers

SEN at SCISSH states that the subdivision Prime ministers under names of countries.

Curtin, John

According to SEN at SCISSH Australia – Prime ministers, see also names of individual Prime ministers.

Australian Labor Party

I have included this heading as John Curtin was the leader of this party, and because the resource examines the possible long term impact on him due to Annie Gunn’s untimely death, this would have inevitably impacted the way the Labor party and Australia was governed during this time.

 

References

SCIS. (2011). Overview and principles of SCIS Subject Headings. Education Services Australia. Retrieved from http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/verve/_resources/Overview.pdf

SCIS. (2015). Guidelines to Using SCIS Subject Headings. Education Services Australia. Retrieved from http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/verve/_resources/SCISSHguidelines.pdf

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