Posts Tagged ‘Ancient Egypt’

Annotated resource list for curriculum topic – Ancient Egypt

Part B – Annotated resource list

Selection criteria and aids for the evaluation and selection of resources help to prioritise and make decisions regarding acquiring the most appropriate materials to support the curriculum and the teaching and learning needs specific to the school context.

Hughes-Hassell and Mancall general selection criteria (2005, p. 44) covers considerations regarding intellectual content, physical format and other considerations. The criteria used will depend on what is judged as a more central factor when evaluating a particular resource.

Further general selection criteria of ‘cost’, ‘format’ and ‘controversial material’ have also been included (The State of South Australia, Department of Education and Children’s Services, 2004, p. Appendix). Additionally, other selection criteria have been used where appropriate when related to a particular format such as electronic resources which may have more specific considerations.

Resource 1

Ancient Egypt. (2015). In Encyclopaedia Britannica. Retrieved from http://school.eb.co.uk/levels/intermediate/article/440312.

Selection Aid

This professional teacher librarian network provided first hand experience of the resource. While there is a need to be wary of personal bias, this resource is available for a free trial so there is the opportunity to view the platform and content before purchase.

Selection criteria

  • Appropriateness, controversial material, authority

The article in this online reference tool differentiates for three different reading levels and also provides an audio option and video clips which is well suited to auditory and ESL learners. The content aligns closely with the history and ICT strands of the curriculum and provides links to journal articles, images and recommended websites so that information is contextualised and provides multiple perspectives for the learner (Hill, 2012, p. 26). All content is filtered, which minimizes possibilities for controversial material, and the articles are written by well respected authors which are reviewed and regularly updated and therefore a reliable source of information.

Resource 2

Steer, D. (2004). Egyptology: Search for the Tomb of Osiris. Surrey: Templar publishing.

Selection Aid

  • Titlewave (www.titlewave.com)
  • Hanke, D. (2005, February). [Review of the book Egyptology: Search for the Tomb of       Osiris, by Steer, D]. Library Media Connection, 23(5), 83.
  • Wichman, C. (2004, November 1). [Review of the book Egyptology: Search for the Tomb of Osiris, by Steer, D]. School Library Journal, 50(11).

Detailed information is provided regarding publication information, interest and reading level, subjects covered and a publisher description. A balanced perspective is provided by links to full-text reviews from a number of authoritative sources including Library Media Connection and School Library Journal. Further filtering options in Titlewave enable more specific search results such as format, publication date, classification and language.

Selection criteria

  • Treatment, appropriateness and format

The book is in hardback and incorporates pull-out and lift-the-flap features. While this potentially makes the book more prone to damage, it is of very good quality and these elements make the book highly interactive and engaging for children, especially kinaesthetic learners. Content is beautifully presented and illustrated and includes key features of a non-fiction text such as diagrams, charts and labels. Postcards, letters, maps, and reports provide a model for concise writing (“Non Fiction”, n.d., para. 11) and link directly to the English writing objectives regarding presentational and organisational features of texts.

Resource 3

Lend me your literacy (www.lendmeyourliteracy.com).

Selection Aid

  • Twitter (www.twitter.com)

Twitter can be used for the exchange of thoughts, ideas and recommendations. While it would rarely be a sole section aid and further evaluation would be required, following educationally established tweeters such as @teacherstoolkit can result in more informative and relevant information filtered into notifications.

Selection criteria

  • Cost, usability and appropriateness

Lend me your literacy (LMYL) is an interactive website that allows students to publish their own writing and comment on others within a worldwide audience. The website is child-friendly, simply designed and easy to navigate (Boon, 2008, p. 258). Search capabilities include filters that sort according to year group, genre and topic. Exposure to different text types, writing, evaluation of others’ work and navigating search features on the website, connect directly to the learning outcomes for KS2. There is a yearly subscription fee which is required for each year group. In a growing school this can mean increased costs, however the service does offer good value for money overall and includes additional services such as teacher professional development and parent workshops which help to extend learning opportunities beyond the classroom.

Resource 4

Deary, T. (2006). The Awful Egyptians. London: Scholastic.

Selection Aid

Reputable publisher websites are useful for viewing the full collection of a series and can potentially be cheaper with discounts when ordering in bulk. The resources on the website are targeted to particular age groups and it is quick to place an order. Potential publisher bias means that to ensure cost effectiveness, authority is a crucial selection criteria when purchasing in bulk.

Selection criteria

  • Authority, cost

Terry Deary is a well respected best-selling author of over 270 books (Deary, 2010, para. 1). His Horrible Histories series have sold over twenty five million copies (Unstead, 2003, para. 1) and have received awards and widespread praise for encouraging reluctant readers, especially boys (Unstead, 2003, para. 8). Learner characteristics are often a key driver in the selection process and this follows the constructivist philosophy of teaching and learning (Hughes-Hassell & Mancall, 2005, p. 36). The resource selected is part of a set which include Awesome Egyptians, which clearly complements the topic in addition to twenty one other books in the series which will expand the non-fiction collection in the library with relevant and engaging material that is age-appropriate.

Resource 5

The Children’s University of Manchester. (2012). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from http://www.childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk/interactives/history/egypt/.

Selection Aid

  • Pinterest (www.pinterest.com)

Pinterest is a curation tool that allows users to visually display bookmarked websites connected to a theme. Users can search by key words which can then generate further specialised selections. It is quick and easy to use, though the tool needs to be used with caution as often the context or related content is separated from the bookmarked image (Educause, 2012, para. 4).

Selection criteria

  • Usability, design, authority and content

This is an academic website run by the University of Manchester and so is an authoritative source. The content is specifically designed to complement the National Curriculum for KS2. Although evaluating website design can be subjective in nature, Latham & Poe (2008, p. 259) highlight the importance of simple text, colours and features which do not distract users or require fast Internet connection speed. Indeed, the site is user-friendly, easy to navigate and would be suitable for children to explore by themselves. The website could also be used for whole-class activities as the interactive content and interface (which enables a full screen view) makes the site suitable for use with Interactive Whiteboards (IWB).

Resource 6

The British Museum. (2010). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/menu.html

Selection Aid

  • Pinterest (www.pinterest.com)

Selection criteria

  • Usability, design, authority and content

Inquiry-based learning requires resources that encourage in-depth reading and research. This website is suitable for this purpose and offers an authoritative, informative and comprehensive overview of the topic. The website is not specifically aimed at children though the language is pitched at an accessible level for KS2. The website’s aesthetics appear a bit outdated and the navigation is not as child-friendly in comparison to other websites for children, but the content aligns to KS2 learning objectives and would be suitable for extension work for higher ability students or for developing deeper research skills with teacher or librarian support.

Resource 7

Kids Discover (2014). Ancient Egypt for iPad (Version 2.0) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ancient-egypt-by-kids-discover/id68260748.

Selection Aid

The iTunes store enables users to search quickly and locate a wide variety of free and paid for apps. However, the preview feature of the app is not extensive so in this case it was necessary to consult the creator’s website for additional information regrading teacher support material and a preview video (www.kidsdiscover.com).

Selection criteria

  • Usability, design, access and cost

This is an engaging and interactive reading app suitable for KS2 children. The platform is easy to use and navigate and elements of touch, images, videos and sound included will appeal to visual, auditory and kinaesthetic learners (Cantwell, 2013, p. 7). The app is included in Apple’s Volume Purchase Program (VPP) which provides 50% discounts to school. This keeps cost more manageable when purchasing in large quantities. The app can be automatically downloaded on users’ devices using the ‘managed distribution’ model that assigns apps per device. This is suitable for a class set of iPads which are stored and distributed from the library.

Resource 8

Apple (2014) iMovie (Version: 2.1.1) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/imovie/id377298193?mt=8.

Selection Aid

Selection criteria

  • Purpose

This app allows users to work collaboratively to create, edit and share their own videos. It directly supports KS2 learning objectives in ICT regarding presenting data and information. The app is intended for use as part of an assessment item at the end of the unit with the students presenting a digital portfolio to include a video presentation of the Ancient Egypt ‘live museum’ performed by students. This resource supports the cross-curricular nature of an inquiry project and the role of the teacher librarian working from this perspective (Mitchell, 2011, p. 13).

Resource 9

Van Vleet, C. (2008). Explore ancient Egypt. Available from titlewave.com.

Selection Aid

  • Titlewave (www.titlewave.com)
  • Dombrowski, C. (2008, June 1). [Review of the book Explore ancient Egypt, by Van Vleet, C]. School Library Journal.

Selection criteria

  • Access, cost, usability

Titlewave enables the integration of ebooks into the library catalogue to include bibliographic details and allows direct access for patrons to check out books via their student/teacher login through Destiny Follett. The ebook is priced at 29 USD and includes unlimited and simultaneous access in addition to being accessible on multiple platforms (including Apple, Android, Kindle and Nook) so represents good value for money. The ebook supports searching, highlighting text, dictionary, text-to-speech (computer only) and limited copy/paste and printing options. These features are additional criteria to consider in addition to print resources that need to be examined when evaluating them for inclusion into the library collection (Feighan, 2012). Benefits for the inclusion of ebooks into the library collection include 24/7 and remote access, (Foley, 2012, p. 11) an appealing format for some users and the fact physical space is not needed for storage of these materials.

Resource 10

Doeden, M. (2014). Tools and treasures of Ancient Egypt. Available from titlewave.com.

Selection Aid

  • Titlewave (www.titlewave.com)
  • Mueller, M. (2014, April). [Review of the book Tools and treasures of Ancient Egypt, by   Mueller, M]. School Library Journal, 60(4), 106.

Titlewave displays full text reviews from journals, education magazines and awards in their resource search result. The benefit of these sources as opposed to crowdsourcing reviews (e.g. http://www.goodreads.com) is that they often provide more authoritative and reliable information written from an educational perspective and with the school library in mind.

Selection criteria

  • Content, appropriateness, cost

Though not recommended for in-depth research, this ebook serves as a good introduction to the topic as well as a specific focus on life in Ancient Egypt (Mueller, 2014, para. 1). As in Resource 9, this ebook covers unlimited and simultaneous access. Deciding between single or simultaneous access models is dependent on the needs of users (Morris & Sibert, 2010, p. 109) and in the case of a school with 5 classes per year group it is the most appropriate and cost effective option.

 

References

Ancient Egypt. (2015). In Encyclopaedia Britannica. Retrieved from http://school.eb.co.uk/levels/intermediate/article/440312.

Apple (2014) iMovie (Version: 2.1.1) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/imovie/id377298193?mt=8.

Boon, L. (2008). “I want it all and I want it now!” : the changing face of school libraries. In J. R. Kennedy, L.Vardaman & G.B. McCabe (Eds.), Our new public, a changing clientele : bewildering issues or new challenges for managing libraries (pp. 173-177). Westport : Libraries Unlimited.

Cantwell, K. ( 2013 ). Living appily ever after in the library. Connections, 86 (1), 6-7. Retrieved from http://www2.curriculum.edu.au/scis/issue_86/articles/living_appily_ever_after_in_the_library.html.

Carrington, B. & Gamble, N. (2004). Egyptology: teacher notes [PDF file]. Retrieved from http://www.templarco.co.uk/teacher_notes/EGYPTteachersNOTES%201-12.pdf

Deary, T. (2010). Home. In Terry Deary. Retrieved from http://www.terry-deary.com/.

Deary, T. (2007). Awesome Egyptians. London: Scholastic

Deary, T. (2006). The Awful Egyptians. London: Scholastic.

Educause. (2012). 7 things you should know about social content curation [PDF file]. Retrieved from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7089.pdf.

Feighan, D (2012, July 30). eBook selection criteria [Blog post]. In Bibiliothekia. Retrieved April 2, 2015, from http://bibliothekia.blogspot.co.uk/2012/07/ebook-selection-criteria.html.

Foley, C. (2012). eBooks for leisure and learning. Scan, 31(4) 6-14.

Hanke, D. (2005, February). [Review of the book Egyptology: Search for the Tomb of Osiris, by Steer, D]. Library Media Connection, 23(5), 83.

Hill, R. (2012). All Aboard! Implementing common core offers school librarians an opportunity to take the lead. School Library Journal, (58)4, 26-30. Retrieved from http://www.slj.com/2012/03/standards/common-core/all-aboard-implementing-common-core-offers-school-librarians-an-opportunity-to-take-the-lead/#_.

Hughes-Hassell, S. & Mancall, J. (2005). Collection Management for Youth : Responding to the needs of learners. Retrieved from http://www.eblib.com.

Johnson, P. (2009).  Developing Collections. In Fundamentals of collection development and management. Chicago: American Library Association.

Kids Discover (2014). Ancient Egypt for iPad (Version 2.0) [Mobile application software]. Retrieved from https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/ancient-egypt-by-kids-discover/id68260748.

Lodge, D. & Pymm, B. (2007). Library managers today : the challenges. In S. Ferguson(Ed.), Libraries in the twenty-first century : charting new directions in information services (pp. 289-310). Wagga Wagga, NSW : Centre for Information Studies, Charles Sturt University.

Mitchell, P. (2011) Resourcing 21st century online Australian Curriculum: The role of school libraries. FYI : the Journal for the School Information Professional, October 2011, 10-15.

Morris, C., & Sibert, L. (2010). Acquiring E-books. In Polanka, S., No shelf required: E-books in libraries (pp. 95-124). ALA Editions: Chicago.

Non-Fiction. (n.d). National Library of New Zealand. Retrieved from http://schools.natlib.govt.nz/creating-readers/genres-and-read-alouds/non-fiction.

Scholastic. (2008). Horrible histories pack. Retrieved from http://shop.scholastic.ie/products/76213.

Smith, A. J. M. & Brown, N. J. (2013). Crossing the language barrier: The potential for school librarians in facilitating cross-cultural teaching and learning in the school library. In Dow, M., School libraries matter: views from the research (pp. 137-149). Santa Barbara: Libraries Unlimited.

Steer, D. (2004). Egyptology: Search for the Tomb of Osiris. Surrey: Templar publishing.

Stripling, B. (2008). Inquiry-based teaching and learning – the role of the library media specialist. Retrieved from http://lgdata.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com/docs/4210/910814/Inquiry_Based_Teaching___Learning_Stripling.pdf.

The Children’s University of Manchester. (2012). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from http://www.childrensuniversity.manchester.ac.uk/interactives/history/egypt/.

The British Museum. (2010). Ancient Egypt. Retrieved from http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/menu.html

The State of South Australia, Department of Education and Children’s Services. (2004). Choosing and using teaching and learning materials : Guidelines for preschools and schools. Retrieved from http://www.decd.sa.gov.au/policy/files/links/Choose_use_booklet_FA.pdf.

Unstead, S. (July 2003). BfK Profile: Terry Deary. In Books for Keeps. Retrieved from http://booksforkeeps.co.uk/issue/141/childrens-books/articles/bfk-profile/bfk-profile-terry-deary.

Wichman, C. (2004, November 1). [Review of the book Egyptology: Search for the Tomb of Osiris, by Steer, D]. School Library Journal, 50(11).

Williams, I. D. (2002). Ensuring quality in the collection of free internet based resources for Australian schools. Access, 16(3), 27-30.