Linked Data

Everyday when I search Google I see the knowledge graph. I had never considered how it was put together until now. It is a good example of linked data. I can see how data has been drawn from various sources so that relationships an be explores. Being more aware of linked data, I spotted the following reference via an RSS feed. Ending the Invisible Library: linked data . The article discusses Google’s Knowledge Graph in relation to libraries. MARC records cannot be read in the current search engine environment so most library data is not available via search engines. Kevin Ford was the project coordinator in the Network development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress and he said “What we need to do is not just talk amongst ourselves better, but we need to start communicating or formatting our data in such a way that we can be visible and seen by…other large organizations, such as the Facebooks and the Yahoo!s and the Bings and the Googles” of the world. (Enis, 2015) The article argued that libraries should support linked data because it produces better results for users and improves library web visibility. I will be watching with keen interest how libraries and linked data develop.

 

Example of Google’s Knowledge Graph

Google Knowledge Panel

By Google (Google web search) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Enis, M. (2015). Ending the invisible library: linked data. Library Journal. Retrieved from http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2015/02/technology/ending-the-invisible-library-linked-data/#_

1 Comment on Linked Data

  1. Judy O'Connell
    March 21, 2015 at 1:00 pm (4 years ago)

    Access is so important – and exactly why the newer RDA has become important for descriptive cataloging. RDA makes rich access possible and helps create linked data.

    Reply

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