March 7, 2017

Digital Citizenship for Educators

My top 5 messages for educators about learning in the digital world:

 

  1. To be a learner today, you have to be a digital learner.  You need to know how to be an effective and literate consumer and contributor of information in digital spaces.
  2. Our students spend much of their lives in digital spaces.  You too are a citizen of the digital world.  You work, play, learn, are entertained, communicate, do business, watch, write, socialise in digital spaces.  You owe it to yourself to be informed about how to do this safely, productively and ethically.  And then you can model this for your students.
  3. You are a lifelong learner, with readily available access to information thanks to the ubiquity of mobile devices.  You need to know how to find and use information easily.  You need to know how to create and share information easily and ethically.  You need to do this with, and alongside your students, so they see you as a teacher and a co-learner.  And you need to see your students as fellow teachers also.
  4. You need to connect and collaborate with other educators.  They help you keep informed, they help you learn, they inspire, challenge and support your work.  Build and nurture a Professional Learning Network that helps you to be the best educator you can be.
  5. You help create the digital learning environment.  Sharing your interactions and collaborations, your insights and reflections openly online contributes to our profession as a whole.  Sharing our collective wisdom and experience can only make us all better.

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May 16, 2015

Assuring Colleagues and Parents that Learning in Games is Possible

Screenshot from Roads of Rome by www.bigfishgames.com

Screenshot from Roads of Rome by www.bigfishgames.com

Brom, Šisler & Slavík (2010) identify three major problems that make it difficult to integrate games with formal education:

  1. lack of acceptance of games as educational tools (games are perceived as leisure time activities with no pedagogic value except perhaps for developing IT skills; there is a tension between learning objectives & gaming objectives, and many believe that given a choice, players will choose gaming objectives over learning objectives)
  2. problem of transfer of learning in game to real-life or other contexts
  3. practical barriers – timetable constraints, quality and reliability of school’s IT equipment and infrastructure, unintelligibility of interfaces and game rules for some teachers

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