Sunday Morning MOOC

Sunday mornings generally mean an early rise with my young kids, a cooked breakfast, a bottomless cup of some fine percolated coffee, and trawling my Twitter feed to catch up on the ‘likes’ that I didn’t have time to read throughout the week.

A couple weeks ago, I added a new thing to my Sunday morning ritual. Tuning into George Couros and Katie Martin lead the Innovator’s Mindset MOOC or #IMMOC weekly Hangout. Thus far they’ve had some really interesting discussions and a solid lineup of special guests. Last week, Kaleb Rashad really struck a chord when he talked about the importance and power of human centred design in education. Feel free to check it out here.   

Our post material for module 4.2 asked “how would you establish a knowledge network?” Before I respond to that, I began thinking about how Couros created such a following for his network? I suppose fairly easily (if you don’t include writing the book)…  As he’s a prolific blogger and sharer over social media; with a firmly established PLN, the organisation of his Innovator’s Mindset network might not be as difficult.

So what about your average connected educator? Would their process be much different?

Thoughts about the platform would need to be considered. What’s best for sharing ideas? Wenger, McDermott, and Snyder’s (2002) seven principles for cultivating communities of practice also comes to mind and is also something that should be considered. In particular, the first principle, design for evolution. While Couros’ hashtag provides a searchable backchannel for those interested in monitoring the discussion, I really like how he’s chosen to have participants upload brief YouTube reflections. This reflects the design for evolution principle whereby they “combine design elements in a way that catalyzes community development”(p. 53).

But I digress… Couros isn’t your average educator.

If I was to have an active role in creating an education-based knowledge network, I’d promote using Twitter, tagging people within my PLN that I’d think would value participating in it. This would expand to experts within the field, hoping they may retweet the post in order for the network to gain traction.   

References

Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. M. (2002). Seven principles for cultivating communities of practice. In Cultivating communities of practice : a guide to managing knowledge (pp. 49-64). Boston : Harvard Business School Press.

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