Hurstville Station Design Brief

Hurstville railway station and Hurstville Central shopping centre is located in the centre of the shopping and business centre of Hurstville. It is a critical part of the suburban infrastructure. The shopping centre covers almost the entirety of the railway station. Nearby is the Hurstville bus interchange, Westfield shopping centre, many office towers and a growing number of residential towers.

The entrance to the station is through the shopping mall which can be accessed via escalator and steps from the centre of the shopping district on the main road as well as ramps from the bus interchanges and the car park above the centre.

Inspiration – The Problem:

Having observed many users of this space, there are various areas which can be enhanced in order to improve customer experience. The main focus area of this design brief is to provide a more pleasant and functional seating space for those using the centre for more than access to the railway platforms.

1. The seating area in the food court could be more aesthetically pleasing.

Foodcourt

2. Additional seating should be provided for those wishing to sit but not eat.

Wouldn’t it be great if the space promoted the idea of arriving early, grabbing a coffee or bite to eat whilst leisurely reading the paper, catching up with a friend or answering emails? One would hope that ‘putting people first’ (Brown, 2011: 382) in this space would create a win-win situation for all stakeholders: customers, shop owners, staff

Whilst the sole problem may be considered to be the  addressing of the needs of the customers using the space, there are many elements that enter into the problem, thereby adding constraints to the design process.

 Constraints:

  • cost of making improvements – who pays for modifications: Shop owners, centre management (via rent collection) Rail Corp?

  • unimpeded access to railway platforms, especially at peak time

  • easy access to exits with shopping trolleys

Knowns:

  • the centre is a very busy place

  • people need easy access to ticket machines, ticket barriers and platform

  • the food court is well patronised

  • people will sit on seats provided

  • groups of gentlemen of Mediterranean background gather as a group whilst their wives shop. This is a cultural practice that is also observed in the Westfield shopping centre across the road.

  • the large supermarket is well patronised

 Unknowns:

  • who will use new seating areas – commuters, shoppers, students?

  • will providing additional seating encourage groups of students to ‘hang around’?

  • will shoppers with trolleys be impeded by larger than expected groups gathering on this side of the centre?

  • will business increase for food outlets?

  • will “waiting gents” and school children share a space happily?

  • Will OPAL card use free up space near ticket machines/attended ticket windows?

 Ideation:

Food court

  • move bins in food court

    • they are in the centre of the space with tables surrounding them.  Not pleasant as a diner. This may have seemed like a good idea at the time, but people must navigate past many tables to get to the centre. Having the bins placed in four outer corners would be better as people will need to pass a corner, regardless of where they sit. The openings of the bins should face away from the diners.

  • better lighting in food court

    • add downlights in wide bulkheads to brighten space

    • lighter table tops

  • place for high school kids to gather (Westfield alternative?)

    • kids may like this but doubt that the adults would. The area outside Coles is quite wide and not as busy as the other side near the food court. Is it a good idea to provide a space for the high school kids to chat or do we assume they are heading to buses, trains? Some will, no doubt, head to Westfield where there is ample space for gathering in food court there.

New seating area on the Coles side of the centre – the less busy side of the centre.

  • place for high school kids to gather instead of standing around chatting

    • kids may like this but doubt that the adults would. The area outside Coles is quite wide and not as busy as the other side near the food court. Is it a good idea to provide a space for the high school kids to chat or do we assume they are heading to buses, trains? Some will, no doubt, head to Westfield where there is ample space for gathering in food court there.

  • seating for “waiting, chatting” gents –

    • move them out of food court to free up tables for diners

    • They are not eating, but a few have coffee. A seating area would need to be positioned so that men were facing each other – long narrow bench (with back rests?)

Prototype: a low cost, efficient way to ensure solutions work (Design Council, 2013: 7)

  • Close off centre bins. Add temporary bins to corners. Watch movement of people in table area to check access to bins and if they use them or leave rubbish on tables for cleaners to remove.

  • mark out seating area to see if it would interfere with foot traffic or people pushing shopping trolleys

  • add cheap plastic chairs to the area to see if they are used

 

References:

Brown, T., & Katz, B. (2011). Change by Design. Journal Of Product Innovation Management, 28(3), 381-383. doi:10.1111/j.1540-5885.2011.00806.x http://ezproxy.csu.edu.au/login?

Design Council (2013). Design for public good. UK Design Council and SEE platform.

 

My Comments on:

Margo’s Blog

Simon’s Blog

Heather’s Blog

2 thoughts on “Hurstville Station Design Brief

  1. Michele, After viewing your initial ideas I can see that you have evolved an authentic Design Brief for Hurstville station. The way you have ordered the process from outlining the problem, including the ideation and finally the prototype seems very logical. Margo

  2. Michele,
    I really liked your thoughts for the Hurtsville station, especially the proposed ideas for the food court to make it more inviting.
    You raised some interesting issues around users and the impact different groups could have in using this space, which of course will impact on the eventual success of a redesign. Making it ‘multiuser’ friendly will always be a problem for designers, but some of your ideas, with careful prototyping and customer feedback could be really useful to reinvigorate this space.
    Yvette

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *