March 4

Reflection: Games in the Classroom

  • What are the challenges you are aware of for playing games in your classroom?

Institutional:

Institutional challenges detract from ‘playing games’ in my classroom. Historically, management have not recognised ‘playing games’ to be a ‘learning and engagement strategy’. Regional focus on ‘tick-a-box’ curriculum makes independent and self-paced learning difficult within a secondary period allocations. A forbidding if you will of ‘game playing’ in class.

Culture:

A culture of rote learning does not recognise gaming as learning. Students have grown with games as ‘fun’ rather than learning; and, staff predominantly utilise the rote methodologies as a ‘path of least resistance’.

Technology:

Cheaper technological alternatives and regional control detract from ‘classroom gaming’ strategies. The tick-a-box curriculum makes independent student achievement difficult to measure, difficult to ‘tick-a-box’.

  • What are the behaviours you want to encourage and discourage?

Encourage:

Student independent engagement should be encouraged. Encourage creative thinking, where answers are not always categorically supplied but are determined.

Students need to develop their creative, problem solving ideals.

Discourage:

Tick-a-box curriculum. A curriculum that detracts from creative thinking, with management entering classes to see if students are eagerly writing needs to be discouraged.